Gananoque Motel And Cabins

Trade Card, Gananoque Motel and Cabins, 1945 – 1958.

Price:  $10.00        Size:  About 3 and 1/4 x 2 and 5/8″

Are there many trade cards for this 1950s era motel still floating around today? Maybe a family member has a stash somewhere, and one would assume others must have survived. After all, it was only about sixty years ago. But, at the time of this post, we see no others online.

To get our bearings, for those of us unfamiliar, Gananoque is a small town on the St. Lawrence River, about a half hour’s drive north, up Highway 2 from Kingston, Ontario.

The reverse of our card reads:

“Souvenirs, Fishing Licences. Phone 517W. Gananoque Motel And Cabins. Highway No. 2 – Just East of Eastern Gateway. Gananoque, Ontario, Canada. Completely Modern Motel. Private Conveniences in Cabins. Lunch Room and Gas Station on Premises. Prop. Agar & Rombough. Box 402 – Gananoque. Our Motto:  It’s a Pleasure to Please.”

G. S. Agar and D. A. Rombough were mentioned in The Ottawa Journal as part of group of honorees of the dealers of the Ottawa Division, Supertest Petroleum Corp., Ltd., who qualified for Long Association Awards in 1952 and again in 1957.

Erin Christie’s article (December 2008)  “End of an era for Country Squire”  filled in some details for us:  Stanley Agar and Donald Rombough’s Gananoque Motel was in business about thirteen years, and was,  “…10 small cabins in a horseshoe, five motel rooms, a gas bar and a snack bar”  when it was sold in 1958 to Warren, Rita and Wayne Gollogly, who renamed it the Cloverleaf Motel. The rest is history for the Gollogly Family who expanded the business into what became the Country Squire Resort and Spa (now under Best Western.)

Sources:  Gananoque. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gananoque. (accessed March 26, 2017).

“Supertest Dealers Honoured.”  The Ottawa Journal. Saturday, April 26, 1952. p. 27. (newspapers.com).

“Receive Supertest Awards.”  The Ottawa Journal. Wednesday, April 10, 1957. p. 19. (newspapers.com).

Supertest Petroleum. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supertest_Petroleum. (accessed March 24, 2017).

Christie, Erin. “End of an era for Country Squire.” December 18, 2008. (www.gananoquereporter.com). Accessed March 26, 2017.

Joseph Chartrand Trade Card

Trade card for Joseph Chartrand, Montréal, Canada. Circa 1885 – 1886.

Price:  $15.00             Size:  2 and 1/2 x 3 and 7/8″

Not in good shape but rare… 

There may be other Jos. Chartrand cards that survived (note artist’s initials at bottom left) but at the time of this post, none are showing online. The front shows a beautiful, evidently popular girl, receiving a letter and flowers from yet another devotee, who delivers his heartfelt admiration in person. (Or is he just the messenger?)  It’s a summery scene, certainly not in line with our current month of December, but the back of the card (Oh, to be able to go back in time and shop at this store) advertises, among other things, a couple of items needed for travel in snow. It reads:

“Jos. Chartrand, (Late with F. X. Brazeau & Co.) Dealer in Indian Curiosities, Snow – Shoes, Toboggans, Lacrosse, Mocassins, Bark Canoes, Bead Work, also Childrens Toys. 1687 Notre Dame Street, Montreal.”

F. X. Brazeau & Co.

F. X. (François-Xavier) Brazeau & Co. was found mentioned under the heading of “Indian Manufactures” in the Sixth Parliamentary Sessional Papers for the Dominion of Canada, year 1887.

Joseph Chartrand

We next found mention of Joseph Chartrand, “dealer in fancy goods, etc.” in a January 1886 publication of The American Stationer. Whether this was the same Notre Dame Street business as on our trade card is unknown, and it may not have been. That Chartrand “made an assignment” (a frequently occurring term in 19th century newspapers) seems to indicate he was having financial problems as in General Assignment or Assignment to the Benefit of Creditors (ABC) an alternative to bankruptcy. Not fun….but, nothing ventured, nothing gained, right? (We hope he fared well in subsequent endeavors and in general had a wonderful life.)

Sources:  Sessional Papers, Volume 10. First Session of the Sixth Parliament of the Dominion of Canada. Session 1887, Volume 20. Report of Sir Charles Tupper, G. C. M. G., C. B., Executive Commissioner, of the Canadian Section of the Colonial and Indian Exhibition at South Kensington, 1886. Ottawa:  Printed by MacLean, Roger & Co., Parliamentary Printers. Wellington Street. 1887.  pp. 56 and 57. (Google Books).

“Trade Gossip.” The American Stationer, Vol. 19, no. 3. January 21, 1886. p. 69. (Google Books).

General assignment. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_assignment. (accessed December 1, 2016).

Giesecke Boot & Shoe Manufacturing Co.

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Trade card for the Giesecke Boot & Shoe Manufacturing Co. Circa 1885 – 1901.

Price:  $12.00

Grand!  And it is, this lithograph from an unknown company showing two children riding a duck (or goose?) The girl, sitting “side-saddle” holds a parasol, while the boy sits astride holding the reigns and is turning back to gaze at her. The duck or goose, take your pick, is about to be happily paddling his way thru some lily pads. The reverse shows:

“Not how cheap, but how good

For Fit. For Wear. For Economy buy

‘Little Shoes for Little Men and Little Women’

None genuine unless stamped on bottom ‘Little Shoes for Little Men’  trade mark registered.

The Giesecke Boot & Shoe M’f’g Co.    Makers”

Owner and president of the company, William Frederick Giesecke, was born in Germany December 4, 1833. He emigrated to the U. S. around May 1, 1858. City directories show that he was manufacturing shoes and boots in St. Louis, Missouri at least from 1870, with addresses centering on Washington Ave. He paired (no pun intended) with Edward A. Meysenburg from about 1876 – 1881. And 1885 thru 1901 directories show the business name as it appears on this trade card. By 1904 the business is under the name of Giesecke – D’Oench – Hays Shoe Co., and the 1908 directory shows there were factories in both St. Louis and Jefferson, Missouri. The obit below from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, dated March 21, 1910, gives more information:

giesecke-obit

Sources:  Edwards’ St. Louis Directory, 1870. p. 360. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Gould’s St. Louis City Directory, 1876. p. 343. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Gould’s Street and Avenue Directory, 1881. p. 428. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington D.C.; NARA Series: Passport Applications, 1795-1905; Roll #: 329; Volume #: Roll 329 – 20 May 1889-24 May 1889. (Ancestry.com)

Gould’s St. Louis Directory, 1895. p. 554. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Gould’s St. Louis Directory, 1901. p. 707. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Gould’s Street and Avenue Directory, 1904. p. 757. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Gould’s Street and Avenue Directory, 1908. p. 658. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

“W. F. Giesecke, Retired Shoe Manufacturer, Buried Monday.” St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 21 March 1910, main edition. (newspapers.com)

Huyler’s Bonbons And Chocolates

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Trade card for Huyler’s Cocoa and Chocolate. Circa 1903.

Price:  $15.00          Size:  4 and 1/2 x 2 and 7/8″

For the Huyler’s or the Goldberg, Bowen & Co. collector:  At the time of this post, this appears to be the only Huyler’s card in this particular design, though the condition is poor due to the creases.

The little scene playing out up top shows two children who’ve found the chocolate stash at home, while the third, the lookout, is in the act of sounding the warning alarm.

On the front:   “Huyler’s Delicious Bonbons and Chocolates. Copyright 1903.”
The back shows a design in blue indicating from pod to cup,  “without alteration”  and  “quality unequaled.”  Printed in red on the side is:

“Sales Agents Goldberg, Bowen & Co.   San Francisco and Oakland, Cal.”

The Goldberg, Bowen & Co. stores were described by a San Francisco Chronicle writer in 1886 as,  “paradise for the bon-vivant,”  offering local grocery, household and other items as well as those imported from all over the world. The company’s origins come by way of The Bowen Bros. (who started out as fruit merchants) and grocery, wine and tea merchants, Lebenbaum & Goldberg. In 1881 Lebenbaum & Goldberg consolidated with The Bowen Bros. and became Lebenbaum, Goldberg & Bowen. In 1885 Bowen bought out Lebenbaum and the company became known as Goldberg, Bowen & Co. Newspaper ads can be found as late as 1925 for their 242 Sutter St., SF address. They prospered in Oakland, as well, having a couple of smaller stores in that city, but expanding to their 13th and Clay Street location around 1901.

Beyond the rubble…

Below, posted here with permission from the California Historical Society, a compelling photo, taken after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, of the site of GB&Co’s earlier Sutter St. store. Beyond the rubble, a large ad on one of the buildings still standing in the background reads:   “Goldberg, Bowen and Co. Grocers Will Open a Grand New Store, Van Ness & Sutter. Present Location 2829 Cal. St., Cor. Haight & Masonic.”   (One hundred and ten years later, this ad could easily mislead us:  2829 California Street and the corner of Haight and Masonic are two different locations.) The 1905 city directory shows all four SF locations as:  230-234 Sutter Street; 2829 California Street; the southwest corner of Haight and Masonic; and 426-432 Pine. In 1909 GB&Co. rebuilt the Sutter St. store at 242-254 Sutter (later just 242 Sutter) and thankfully, the building still stands today. Oh, but the poignant toppled stonework with the fox or wolf’s head, front left (!) The fox has a ring in his mouth, sort of reminding one of a large doorknocker. Wonder what building he had belonged to?

GB&C photo

Title: Site of Sutter St. store of Goldberg, Bowen & Co. [No. 103.] Creator/Contributor: Knight, George H. Date: 1906. Credit Line: Courtesy, California Historical Society

Other Sources:  Huyler’s. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huyler’s. (accessed June 11, 2016).

“The Epicure’s Resort.”  San Francisco Chronicle, December 8, 1886, Wednesday, p. 1. (Newspapers.com.)

“Consolidation!”  San Francisco Chronicle, December 8, 1881, Saturday, p. 2. (Newspapers.com.)

“Goldberg, Bowen & Co. Importers of Fancy Groceries and Caterers to Epicures in Table Delicacies and Fine Wines.”  San Francisco Chronicle, August 8, 1885, Saturday, p. 2. (Newspapers.com.)

“New Store A Big Success.”  Oakland Tribune, February 13, 1901, Wednesday, p. 2. (Newspapers.com.)

Crocker-Langley’s San Francisco City Directory, 1905. p. 2127. (Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.)

Queen Anne Soap, Detroit Soap Co.

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Trade card, Detroit Soap Company. Circa 1883. Copyright, Clay & Richmond, Buffalo. N.Y.

Price:  $20.00            Size:   About 2 and 1/2 x 3 and 3/4″

Here’s an unusual choice for a trade card image, sort of:  a knight on a white horse, thundering down a country road. Looks like he’s on a mission, or exhausted coming back from one. You would expect to see a more victorious image of a knight in armor, the well-rested horse and rider….majestic bearing, etc. But that’s one of the great things about pursuing old trade cards:  finding the unexpected. Musing on an idea now…of things being less standardized decades ago. Makes sense, and sounds like a good theme for a college paper. Or, maybe more accurately, how images evolve over time. But back to the trade card, which shows:

“Queen Anne Soap. The Favorite Family Soap of America. The Purest and Best in the World. Manufactured by Detroit Soap Co., Detroit, Mich.”

“Copyright, Clay & Richmond, Buffalo. N.Y. 1883.”

From Detroit Free Press newspaper ads and articles the Detroit Soap Company started up in the summer of 1881, or shortly prior, and were originally located at Dix Avenue, between 24th and 25th streets in Detroit. The company was managed by Samuel Post of Ypsilanti, and his sons William R., and Samuel, Jr. (The time-frame for the sons was not researched.) A fire on May 7, 1898 destroyed the Dix Ave plant which then stood abandoned for at least a couple of years. Sometime after the fire in the same year, 1898, the factory was re-built at a different location on 25th St. and another constructed at what was the foot of Leib St. on the riverfront, just west of Mt. Elliott Ave and kitty corner from the western edge of Belle Isle. Queen Anne Soap stores were located on 77 Woodward Ave in Downtown Detroit, as well as in Saginaw, Grand Rapids and Toledo. In 1915 the Detroit Soap Co. was sold to Lautz Bros. & Co., making that a pretty good soap-making run of about thirty-four years.

A couple of “buy local” requests from about 135 years ago….so timely for today, eh?

Detroit Soap Co Ad 10 Aug 1881   Detroit Free Press, August 10, 1881

Detroit Soap Co Ad 14 Aug 1881   Detroit Free Press, August 14, 1881

From the top, Michigan in 1881 is still considered to be  “in the West.”  And from the article above,  “All things being equal, home industries should be patronized exclusively, for the support given by the people of a city to its manufacturers, encourages and sustains them. Without manufacturing enterprises no village could ever hope to become a city.”  Funny to think of Detroit as a village, but then in 1881 that village image was not as far removed, time-wise. Fast forward to today, in 2016, and here we are talking about, getting involved in, and cheer leading for, the continued resurgence of the city of Detroit. (If one could be in two places at once…anyway, Luv baby, 313 😉 )

Fire at the original building on Dix

Reduced To Ashes   Detroit Free Press, May 8, 1898

From the above, seven fire engines were called to the scene, firefighters Edward Bates, Joseph Hockenfeldt and Frank Gaffney of Engine Company 10, miraculously escaped death. Other names mentioned are Fire Chief Broderick and Night Engineer Bullock who discovered the fire and Night Watchman, William Robbins who sounded the alarm.

Factories   Detroit Free Press, January 1, 1899

According to the above, which was under the heading,  “Building in Detroit in 1898. Operations show an improvement despite contrary figures”  it appears the company re-built at a different location on 25th Street, as well as building a new factory at 304-312 Wight Street. The Wight St. address must have been what became referred to as “foot of Leib St.” and would be the location in the drawing below.

The Riverfront, Detroit Soap Company and civic pride

Queen Anne Soap Factory   Detroit Free Press, May 27, 1906

The riverfront location for the Detroit Soap Co. was at the foot of Leib Street, just west of Mt. Elliott Ave, at what is now the Harbortown area. Leib is no longer at the river, only a portion of it remains, a little further north. Check out the current era before and after photos of the riverfront (awesome transformation!) under the Riverwalk category at the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy website. That’s part of Belle Isle at the bottom right in the image below.

Leib St 1901  1901 map showing Leib St.

The partial Riverfront map above is from Polk’s city directory for Detroit, 1901. It’s a great reference if you’re looking for a city map from this era, and will be found at the beginning of the directory, right before the cover page.

Free Excursions   Detroit Free Press, May 27, 1906

May 1906:  50 soap wrappers per adult and 35 per child would get you a trip and back to Bois Blanc on the “magnificent” steamer Columbia and 75 per adult and 40 per child would get you a trip and back to Put-in-Bay on the “flyer of the lakes, the handsome” steamer Frank E. Kirby. If you notice, the offer says Queen Anne Soap has been around for 30 years, but nothing was found for them or Detroit Soap Co. prior to 1881, so maybe the facts were stretched a little.

Detroit Soap Sells to Buffalo Firm   Detroit Free Press, Sept. 13, 1915

Above, the Buffalo, N.Y. firm, Lautz Bros. & Co. acquire the Detroit Soap Co.

Sources:  “Patronize Michigan Manufacturers!” Detroit Free Press, Wednesday, August 10, 1881. p. 5. (Newspapers.com)

“Business Points.”  Detroit Free Press, Sunday, August 14, 1881. p. 1. (Newspapers.com)

“Reduced to Ashes.”  Detroit Free Press, Sunday, May 8, 1898. p. 20.  (Newspapers.com)

“Factories.”  Detroit Free Press, Sunday, January 1, 1899. p. 7. (Newspapers.com)

“Sayings and Doings”  Detroit Free Press, Wednesday, August 15, 1900. p. 5. (Newspapers.com)

“Plant of Detroit Soap Co. Where Improvement of River Front Began.”  Detroit Free Press, Sunday, May 27, 1906. p. 4. (Newspapers.com)

Detroit city map. R. L. Polk & Co.’s Detroit City Directory, 1901. (Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995).

“Free Excursions to the Users of Queen Anne Soap.”  Detroit Free Press, Sunday, May 27, 1906. p. 14. (Newspapers.com)

“Detroit Soap Co. Sells Business to Buffalo Firm.”  Detroit Free Press, Monday, September 13, 1915. p. 5. (Newspapers.com)

Brown & Dawson, Druggists

Brown And Dawson Druggists Syracuse NY tc1

Trade Card, circa 1887. Syracuse, New York.

Price:  $15.00     Size:  About 2 and 5/8 x 4 and 3/8″

“I use Toilet No. 13 Cologne. Made by Brown & Dawson, Druggists, No. 13 South Salina Street, Syracuse, N. Y.    Fragrant!    Delicious!”

Yikes, delicious?! Not how we would describe perfume or cologne today, I don’t think. Wonder if they named it number 13 after their address? In any case this is the second Bufford trade card of the same design (see prior post) and we’ll see what we can find for Brown & Dawson.

The 1879 city directory shows W. L. Brown and E. S. Dawson, Jr., Druggists.

W. L. was living at 223 Genesee Street in Syracuse in 1880, per the Federal Census, occupation Druggist. He was born in New York, about 1845. Married to Gertrude F., about five years his junior. Their children on this census are Garrett, Mabel and Guy, ages ten to three. Also in the household are Minnie Carey, domestic servant, and James Burrell, boarder.

The 1870 Federal Census for Syracuse reveals that W. L.’s given name is Willet (spelled with two t’s here). He’s there with wife Gertie, other family members Rebecca and Frank, and a Sarah Elmendorf, maybe a servant or border.

We also see Find A Grave has an entry for him, and this shows his wife’s maiden name was Garrett. And the 1910 Federal Census shows that Willet Brown is still operating as a druggist.

So, who was E. S. Dawson, Jr?

We went to Google eBooks to find that he was Edward S. Dawson, Jr. and how nice to find a biography and a photo. Edward was born September 29, 1852 in Syracuse and got into the pharmacy business as a bottle washer at age 16, eventually partnering with Willet Brown in 1887.  See The Pharmaceutical Era, Vol. 35  for the full account.

Edward S. Dawson Jr

Sources:  Boyd’s Syracuse City Directory, 1879 – 1880. p. 92. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Year: 1880; Census Place: Syracuse, Onondaga, New York; Roll: 908; Family History Film: 1254908; Page: 496A; Enumeration District: 222; Image: 0292. (Ancestry.com)

Year: 1870; Census Place: Syracuse Ward 6, Onondaga, New York; Roll: M593_1063; Page: 364A; Image: 118471; Family History Library Film: 552562. (Ancestry.com)

Find A Grave Memorial #74337313. (findagrave.com). Web accessed May 22, 2016.

Year: 1910; Census Place: Syracuse Ward 12, Onondaga, New York; Roll: T624_1057; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 0152; FHL microfilm: 1375070. (Ancestry.com)

Kennedy, Ezra J., Ph. C. (ed.). (1906) The Pharmaceutical Era, Vol. XXXV. p. 417. (Google eBook).

Page & Nunn, Brockton, Mass

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Trade Card, circa 1882, Brockton, Massachusetts.

Price:  $15.00             Size:  About 2 and 5/8 x 4 and 3/8″

“Page & Nunn, Manufacturers of the Purest and Finest Confectionery, 427 Main St., Brockton, Mass.        D. L. Page.     F. T. Nunn.”

A trade card in what we like to call the “Breakthrough” style (see category under this name for more) and we couldn’t resist putting this one up after the Lupe Patton post because of the hairstyle and angle of the pose (he he). This was done by the well-known lithography firm Bufford of Boston, Mass. This particular design of the beautiful child with the soulful brown eyes may have been a popular choice back in the day:  We have another that will go up next, advertising a different company.

Dudley and Frederick

Page & Nunn were Dudley L. Page and Frederick T. Nunn according to the 1886 Lowell, Mass. city directory. Dudley was living in a house located on Humphrey “near Dracut line” and Fred was rooming at the shop, which was located at 46 Merrimack in Lowell. They appear in the 1888 Lowell directory, as well.

Page & Nunn Ad 1886

1882 in Brockton

But per our trade card Page & Nunn were found in the Brockton city directory 1882 with the business address same as on the card. There was supposed to be an ad for them on page 456, but evidently it never got submitted. The 1882 shows Dudley was living in a house in Lowell, and Fred was rooming at the Star Building on Main St. in Brockton.

A little more on Dudley

Dudley L. Page was found on the 1880 Federal Census for Lowell, living with his widowed mother, Ann Page, at 42 Church St. Dudley is listed as married, born in New Hampshire about 1846. Also in the household are grandchildren of Ann:  Lucien, Lena and Archie McLoon.

Sources:  John Henry Bufford. n.d https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Henry_Bufford (accessed May 22, 2016).

Sampson, Murdock & Co.’s The Lowell Directory, 1886, No. XXXV. p. 460, 473, 828. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

C. F. Copeland’s, The Brockton City Directory, 1882. pp. 155 and 161. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Year: 1880; Census Place: Lowell, Middlesex, Massachusetts; Roll: 545; Family History Film: 1254545; Page: 563D; Enumeration District: 469; Image: 0628. (Ancestry.com)

Ushering In Easter

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There’s the Easter Bunny and one Easter egg behind the young gentleman in the flared double-breasted coat with the wide lapels, checkered pants, top hat and walking cane, with gloves in hand. It’s a spring day, the lilies of the valley are in bloom, and the flowing red lines appearing from “underneath” the scene, as well as the flowing lines of the lilies of the valley, are very Art Nouveau; a beautiful advertising piece from the Fleischmann Company. A “Handsome Banner Picture” could be obtained in exchange for 50 Yellow Labels taken from the cakes of their Compressed Yeast.

Exactly what is meant by “banner picture” is not quite clear. And an internet search did not illuminate the answer.

As to the time-frame for the card, perhaps mid-1880s to 1890s.  An entry in New York City directories in 1886 shows,  “Fleischmann Maximilian, yeast, 701 Washn. & 219 E. 23d, h. 115 Madison av.”  which half-way matches the address given on the back of the card as 699-701 Washington St. The exact address given is proving hard to find in online sources, surprisingly. Newspaper ads show the 701 Washington address at least into the late 1920s. And numerous entries in various years show both “Fleischmann & Co.” and “The Fleischmann Co.”

Trade card, lithograph for The Fleischmann Co., Form No. 910A. Made in Germany. Circa mid-1880s – 1890s.

Price:  $10.00        Size:  3 and 1/2 x 5 and 1/2″

Source:   Trow’s New York City Directory, Vol. XCIX, for year ending May 1,1886.  p. 606. (Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995).

W. L. S. A. Choice Groceries

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A dream of spring?

Here’s an unusual trade card for a couple of reasons:  the design – a spring scene of two ladies bundled up for the weather, one holding a tree branch that is budding with red flowers; she seems to be offering it to a seated gentleman, he even more bundled up in overcoat, hat and fur collar (really is this a woman or man?) On his lap he holds a basket with a goose (ready to be cooked for dinner). The tableau takes place inside a large shell, a crescent moon appears in the sky and a couple of rustic houses in the background. The shell is nestled atop a low-growing bush, not yet leafed out for spring, and there are a few birds lost in their own world, hunting for food, one in a branch and the other two at the base of the bush. The colors showing the iridescence of the shell are beautiful:  pink, yellow, orange, a little blue and purple. Wow, all in all, is this an artist’s daydream of spring? The fowl certainly is appropriate for the business the card was advertising, though. Which leads us to the second unusual thing about this card:  The W. L. S. A. grocery at 26 Market Square in Lynn, Mass was not located in online records. There are a couple of other trade cards for this business presently for sale online, but like ours, nothing shows on the back. And the lithographer name does not appear on any of the cards.

One hundred ninety-something grocers…

This card’s date is given a broad range of 1880s to 1890s, just a typical estimate for a trade card. In searching for the 26 Market Sq. address, nothing came up related to groceries. In the year 1895 (just a random year in the general time frame) there were almost 200 persons or businesses listed under the heading of Grocers. That seemed like a lot at first but maybe not, as the population five years later was over 68 thousand. In any case, one gets the impression that the grocery business for many, might have been short-lived. It would seem this was likely the case for the W. L. S. A., unless it was just the name that was short-term.

Trade card for the W. L. S. A. grocery, Lynn, Massachusetts. Publisher unknown. No. 2500. Circa 1880s – 1890s.

Price:  $15.00

Sources:  Sampson, Murdock & Co.’s The Lynn Directory, 1895, Vol. XXX. pp. 715 – 716. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Timeline of Lynn, Massachusetts. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_Lynn,_Massachusetts. (accessed March 2, 2016).

Glenwood Stoves And Ranges

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This is the second stove trade card that we have so far; there are sure to be more. The front of the card is a beautiful lithograph by the J. Ottman Co. of a lovely smiling brunette wrapped in a large blue head scarf (makes you think warmth) and states  “Perfect with a faultless record.”  On the back:

“Glenwood Stoves and Ranges! The Glenwood is indispensible to progress in cookery as well as comfort and convenience in modern housekeeping.

Sold by L. L. Crosby, Putney, VT.”

Tinsmith, Leslie L. Crosby

The seller is Leslie L. Crosby, and we find his marriage record online:  On September 19, 1889, he married Jessie R. Underwood in Putney, Vermont. Leslie was born in Waltham, Mass to Ariel Crosby and Marion Weston. His occupation at the time was Tinsmith, his age 25, so he was born about 1864.

Waltham, Mass city directories for 1884 and 1886 list Leslie L. Crosby, Tinsmith, at address Bacon corner of School, and  “bds do”  is “boards ditto” so presumably working and living at the same address. Surprisingly, not much else came up on Leslie in online searches. So, on to Glenwood…

We see a very similar to ours, Glenwood stove model at Sarah’s Antique Stoves. Scroll down to their 063 Glenwood H 1893 entry. (Wow, one could instantly fall in love with antique stoves. Such beauty!)

Glenwood stoves and ranges were made by the Weir Stove Company of Taunton, Mass. See the Good Time Stove Co.

Always looking in ads…

In newspaper advertisements “Glenwood Ranges” are starting to be mentioned around 1883 but “Glenwood Stoves and Ranges” not mentioned as such till around 1887. Here’s one of the latter that appeared in the Sacramento, California Union-Record July 8th.

1887 Ad for Glenwood

Jumping ahead about thirty years, a Kingston, New York ad that appeared February 13th 1917 in The Kingston Daily Freeman. With that caption you’d wonder if the temperature had dropped to negative 16 degrees that winter.

16 Below Ad for Glenwood

Last but not least, for more on Wier see the Wikipedia article Old Weir Stove Building. The old Weir building later housed the Rogers Silver Company. Photo (public domain) by Marcbela (Marc N. Belanger). This building is on the U. S. National Register of Historic Places.

FB Rogers

_______________________________________________

Trade Card for Glenwood Stoves and Ranges. Sold by L. L. Crosby. Circa 1890s. Lithographer: J. Ottmann Lithography Company, New York.

Price:  $7.00

Sources:  Original data: State of Vermont. Vermont Vital Records through 1870. New England Historic Genealogical Society, Boston, Massachusetts. (Ancestry.com)

W. A. Greenough & Co.’s The Waltham and Watertown Directory, 1884. p. 54. (Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995).

W. A. Greenough & Co.’s The Waltham and Watertown Directory, 1886. p. 73. (Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995).

“Stoves For Sale – 063 Glenwood H 1893.”  (sarahsantiquestoves.com) Web accessed February 28, 2016.

Good Time Stove Co. (stoveprincess@goodtimesstove.com) Web accessed February 28, 2016.

Santa Ana Register. Sacramento, California. Friday, July 8, 1887. p. 2. (Newspapers.com)
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