Swans Ringing The Bell

Divided back, unused postcard. Publisher:  Dawkes & Partridge, 29 High Street, Wells. Number 25.

Price:  $2.00

A Dawkes & Partridge postcard with the description:

“Swans Ringing The Bell. The picturesque Moat which surrounds Bishop’s Palace, at Wells, is noted for its beautiful Swans. A unique and interesting habit of these Swans is to ring, when hungry, for food; a bell being placed beneath the window from which the food is thrown. The Swans were first taught to ring the bell by Miss Eden, daughter of Lord Auekland, Bishop of Bath & Wells, A. D. 1854 – 69.”

The swan tradition has continued till the present day, though a recent article from the BBC dated October 24, 2018 reported that the resident swan and her brood has re-located.

Source:  “Bell-ringing swan Wynn leaves The Bishop’s Palace.” https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-somerset-45967935 (accessed November 11, 2018).

St. Mary’s Church, Hogsthorpe

Divided back, Real Photo Postcard. Circa 1930s – 1950s. Publisher:  A. E. Wrate, Lumley Rd., P. O. Skegness.

Price:  $10.00

A commercial-type Real Photo Postcard, that would have been a good one to use for Halloween, but just to continue with a couple more from England before moving on to Veteran’s Day….and we’re guessing on the date, maybe from the 1930s through 1950s. Note the blurriness around the outer edges of the photo (for some reason). We’re guessing that A. E. Wrate is Alfred Ernest Wrate, born in 1916, son of Alfred Wrate and Amelia Elizabeth (Moody) Wrate, but all three family members are listed in census records as being in the photography business. Wrate’s was also known for its “walking pictures.” See Go Home on a Postcard‘s entry “Wrates – Skegness.”

St. Mary’s Church, located in Hogsthorpe, a small village of the East Lindsey district in Lincolnshire county, dates originally from the 12th century.

Sources:  Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA), 1911. (Ancestry.com).

The National Archives; Kew, London, England; 1939 Register; Reference: RG 101/6452F.(Ancestry.com).

Ancestry.com. England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007.

FreeBMD. England & Wales, Civil Registration Marriage Index, 1837-1915. (Ancestry.com).

“Wrates – Skegness.”  Go Home on a Postcard. https://gohomeonapostcard.wordpress.com/companies/wrates-skegness/ (accessed November 11, 2018).

Hogsthorpe. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hogsthorpe (accessed November 11, 2018).

Dual-Pitched Hipped Roof Craftsman

Divided back, unused Real Photo Postcard. CYKO stamp box. Circa 1907 – 1915.

Price:  $10.00

A rare roof….

We’re not house experts here at LCG, but feel pretty confident we’ve got the right i.d. for this house style:  If all four sides of the roof slope downward toward the walls, that’s the definition of hipped. We can see that the front and sides do, and are having a difficult time imagining the back not doing the same, thusly 😉 we think hipped. And dual-pitched since the roof pitch changes, pretty dramatically so, in this case. (You might be reminded of the kids’ wooden building blocks where you can top off the structure with that triangular-shaped one.) Anyway, in our go-to reference, A Field Guide to American Houses, the dual-pitched hipped roof is stated as being rare. As for the Craftsman features, one of the most easily recognizable is the unenclosed eve overhang that lets us see part of the roof rafters.

As you’ve noted, there’s no writing on the back of the card to identify the nice family in the photo, or their location. They were the proud owners, no doubt, of this home that was probably new or new-ish when the photo was taken. The time-frame is about December 1907 due to the divided back, till the mid-1910s, or so, due to the clothing style and what looks like some evidence of button-top leather shoes, which were prevalent prior to WWI.

Source:  McAlester, Virginia, and Lee McAlester. A Field Guide to American Houses. 1984. New York:  Alfred A. Knopf, 1990. Print.

Grandpa By The Fence

Divided back, Real Photo Postcard, unused. AZO stamp box. Circa 1907 – 1918.

Price:  $4.00

Well, somebody’s Grandpa most likely. No identifying information for this gentleman. I think of him of having German ancestry, but maybe that’s because I’ve been looking at breweriana items just now….But these old fences to me are beautiful, each plank and post is unique. No mass production here. (Not to mention the house with attachment.) Notice the paper bag at the man’s feet, with writing, no less. If only we could zoom in to read the print! This vein brought up the question:  When was the paper bag invented? Per Wikipedia it was 1852. Surprising. And remember when people used to call them paper sacks? (Maybe some still do.)

Source:  Paper bag. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_bag (accessed September 23, 2018).

An Old Outbuilding

Divided back, Real Photo Postcard, unused. Circa 1907 – 1910s.

Price:  $4.00    

Rural America….a glimpse back

This postcard’s pretty beat up but still, or probably partly because of that, I love it. I love the pattern in the wooden shingles on the face of the, what would one call this, big shed? (Guess that’s why outbuilding works so well 😉 ) Maybe it was used for storage, or was once a chicken coop, though no evidence of chickens at this time. If you click to enlarge, and look inside, you can see what looks like a patchwork quilt covering up something. I love the window that looks like it was thrown together (sorry to whoever built it) and the short boards underneath the one end to make it all somewhat level. (Was it built that way or shored up later after heavy rains?) And last but not least, the young woman, laughing, the little girl with her toy wheeled cart, and their dog (caught in the middle of a bark or a yawn.) It’s a happy photo, and a glimpse back a hundred years or so, of life on the farm.

Dinna Forget

Divided back, embossed, unused postcard, circa 1910 – 1911. Publisher:  Household Journal.

Price:  $7.00

This beautiful postcard was intended to go out to a Household Journal subscriber as a reminder to “dinna forget” to renew their subscription, and also was a sample from Household Journal’s “grand set of new Post Cards for 1911.”

The reverse shows the printed:

“Dear Friend – ‘Old friends are best,’ and while I am glad to welcome many new readers, I am more than doubly pleased to have my old friends renew their subscriptions. I will be much disappointed if you do not accept one of my very liberal offers. Won’t you please attend to it today? Cordially yours W. A. Martin. Editor Household Journal.”

For our American homes and all lovers of flowers…..more than a million readers

Here’s a link for the monthly volumes from years 1912 – 1913, Household Journal and Floral Life (enter at your own risk 😉 you may find yourself still immersed hours later). The ads and offers are particularly fascinating, such as the European-made, brass covered telescope, “See 10 Miles for only $1.00.”  Good for counting livestock on the ranch, finding out who was coming up the drive in the carriage, not to mention checking out your neighbors (yikes!) Give one hour of your time distributing keepsake certificates and earn a magnificent set of dishes of a wild rose design, in natural colors edged in gold. Or the offer to “Come to Florida and Live Like a Prince” on a thriving fruit or truck farm (truck farm?) We like the instruction type articles too, like how to make flower essence oil (p. 33 in the last volume). Also of note, for the historical researcher, and for anyone trying to date their old photos by clothing style, note the oftentimes full-page illustrations of the latest modes in fashion.

Source:  Household Journal and Floral Life. Vol. V. – VI., 1912 – 1913. The Central Publishing Co., Springfield, Ohio. books.google.com.

Clan Fraser Of Lovat

Divided back, unused postcard. Publisher:  Photochrom Co. Ltd. Graphic Studios, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England. Circa 1950s.

Price:  $8.00

Calling all Highland Frasers…..

A vintage postcard from around the 1950s showing a spray of harebells (campanula rotundifolia) also called bluebells,  blawort, lady’s thimble, witch’s bells, and witch’s thimbles with one of the Scottish Highland’s Fraser of Lovat clan tartans and coat of arms. Clan Fraser of Lovat is not to be confused with Clan Fraser (of the Lowlands) though the two are said to be related.

And I really would have guessed earlier on this card than the circa 1950s date but an entry shows on eBay for one dated 1957. The publisher though, according to MetroPostcard, was established in 1896.

Sources:  Campanula rotundifolia. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campanula_rotundifolia. (accessed August 19, 2018).

Clan Fraser of Lovat. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Fraser_of_Lovat. (accessed August 19, 2018).

“P – publishers – page 1”  List of publishers. MetroPostcard.com. (accessed August 19, 2018).

Loch Lomond By E. Longstaffe

Postcard, unused. Artist-signed by E. Longstaffe. Publisher unknown. Circa 1904 -1905.

Price:  $5.00

Continuing with our short excursion to Scotland….an artist-signed card by English landscape painter, Edgar Longstaffe (1852 – 1933). The few others currently for sale online are dated from 1904 and 1905 (though were put out by other publishers). This particular offering is not in the best shape – the layers of paper comprising the card are starting to peel away from each other, but since Scotland had seemed to be a somewhat neglected area of my collection, I was happy to find this card and include it here.

Source:  Edgar Longstaffe. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Longstaffe (accessed August 8, 2018).

Sidewinders

Divided back, Real Photo Postcard. AZO stamp box, circa 1907 – 1918.

Price:  $3.00

I couldn’t get the title of this post out of my head for possible names. Not to liken the two beautiful ladies to rattlesnakes (of all things!) And then not to say that rattlesnakes are not beautiful (though understandably not wishing to encounter one, except for maybe at a nice distance) but it’s their hairstyles:  the hair wound into a side bun for each, and a very elegant style it is. Both have a glittering hair clip as an accent. Guessing the two women might be sisters.

A Postal Telegram….Don’t Worry!

Divided back, unused postcard. Circa 1907 – 1910s. Publisher APC or AP Co. Series or number 2119.

Price:  $7.00

“Postal Card Telegram. From ______. I get the blues every time I think of leaving this place; I’m thinking of locating here permantly. Don’t Worry!

A tricky spelling for many….

Ha, well permanently was misspelled above. Interesting. In looking for “permantly” in Newspapers.com (I wondered for a sec if the spelling had changed) from years 1832 to the present, over 13,000 entries were found, the last one dated in 2016. Sure, compared to the over 8 million entries found under the  correct spelling of permanently, 13k is not so very much, but still, it’s proof that the word has permanently confounded some of us English-speakers. 😉 And most definitely we can find the incorrect spelling in abundance still today, in ads, social media, etc. and though some is hasty typing, ignore spell check, no biggie type of thing, others are well, not so much.

No worries

The “not to worry” instruction to the receiver…hmmm:  Guessing that is because telegrams were often needed to send bad news, especially during the war. Or maybe, the sender is saying don’t worry, I’ll be coming back, or even don’t worry about me after I leave because I’ll be fine just as soon as I get back to you! And the image, though not of the best quality, is a charmer, of a happy couple, she in her high-brimmed bonnet and he in his straw boater, holding an umbrella.

Publisher name unknown

A nice header on the reverse shows the logo of the publisher:  maybe standing for AP or APC Company. If memory serves, this is one we haven’t come across yet.