Hauskaa Pääsiäista

Divided back, used postcard. Paletti, Sarja Pääsiäinen. Circa 1930.

Price:  $10.00

An Easter card from Finland of a proud rooster with all his baby chicks, and the caption translating to merry, fun or amusing, or maybe just Happy Easter. The cancellation date is difficult to read, however the stamp should be from 1930. Paletti as you’ve guessed is Palette (not sure if this is the publisher name or not) and Sarja Pääsiäinen, as you’ve probably also guessed, is Easter Series. The card is addressed:

“Herrasväki Sivulat, Helsinki, Laivurinkatu 39.”  And on the front (we need a native speaker) it appears to say  “F:  Utriaiset.”  Below, the location this postcard went to in 1930. If we could time travel to be there as it was being received….(!)

Sources:  Stamps of Finland: Definitives of 1930 – 1946. Stamp-Collecting-World. (accessed April 1, 2018).

“Laivurinkatu 39 00150 Helsinki, Finland.” Google.com maps. (accessed April 1, 2018).

An Easter Message Just For You

Easter greeting card. Circa 1930s – 1940s.

Price:  $5.00         Size:  Folded into four sections, 5 and 1/4 x 3 and 7/8″

This card is prettier “in person” (huh? lol) with the shimmering gold tone when you hold it at an angle. No publisher name or any writing on it at all, other than the inside printed verse:

“Thinking of you?

Well I guess!

Always wish you happiness!

Like to see you?

Would I? Say –

That would be a real joy today!”

To Ilma From Edna

Divided back, embossed postcard. Postmarked April 12, 1911, San Francisco, California. Publisher:  International Art Publishing Co. Series 1262. Printed in Germany.

Price:  $7.00

Fond Easter Greetings

“Hope and gladness, peace and rest

Make your Easter truly blest.”

Wow, where did the time fly? Easter already! Here’s the first offering for this year, and we’ll try to get a few more up today. This one hearkens back to 1911, a beautiful card of a bunny in an Easter egg, framed by lilies of the valley and a few violets, from the International Art Publishing Co. It was sent by Edna Steacy to Miss Ilma Rogers of 3651 20th St., San Francisco, CA.

Ilma, an unusual name (I kept trying to type Alma) was found on the 1900 Federal Census, born in California, January 1893, the daughter of Charles S. and May C. Rogers. In the household are the parents Charles and May, Charles’ mother Jenny M. Rogers and children Oris R., Ilma F. and Charles S. Rogers, address 227 Chattanooga, San Francisco. So, Ilma was eighteen when she received this card.

Source:  Year: 1900; Census Place: San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Page: 11; Enumeration District: 0108. (Ancestry.com).

Easter Joy Attend You

Divided back, embossed postcard. Unused with writing. Publisher:  International Art Publishing Co., New York and Berlin. Printed in Germany. Circa 1907 – 1914.

Price:  $8.00

The spring colors are beautiful in this card, and the theme is egg shell bells and pussy willows, with a narrow road stretching off into the distance…On the back is written,  “Miss Conroy Form Dora.”  Heehee, “from” is charmingly misspelled. This looks like it might have been a card from child to teacher.

Easter Chick For Verne

Divided back, embossed postcard, unused with writing. Copyright 1909, H. Wessler. Series:  422.

Price:  $7.00

A Peaceful Easter.

Chicks rule this year…and this is another beauty, a charmer (that face!) Our chick appears in an oversized eggshell, the top broken off; egg and chick comfortably nestled in a cluster of lilies of the valley. Note how very well-done the subtle shading is around the shell and flowers, and the white decorative trim at top and bottom is beautiful, especially falling as it does on that shade of gray for the background.

In pencil, on the reverse, is written:   “Verne from Aunt Bertha.”  And with no loss of elegance from front to back, the publisher’s lily design (a bonus for Easter, we reckon 😉 ) divides the back, and the top corner holds a matching stamp box.

A publisher mystery

Who was H. Wessler? At the time of this post, no identifying records were found for him. He’s mentioned in a Google book snippet along with John Wensch (see prior post), as both being importers and producers of beautiful greeting and postcards. We presume that Wessler, like Wensch, was of German ancestry. Quite a number of postcards can be found online for him, but none showing the full name. This is the second H. Wessler we have on LCG:  See Just A Few Lines From.

Source:  Lighter, Otto & Reeder, Pearl. Hobbies. Vol. 59, p. 147. 1954: Lightner Publishing. Google snippet. Accessed April 16,  2017.

A Lucy Larcom Easter Greeting

Divided back, embossed, unused postcard. Design copyright John Winsch, 1911. Printed in Germany.

Price:  $5.00

In tones of rose, forget-me-not-blue and plum….A Happy Easter!

“Every flower to a bird has confided

The joy of its blossoming birth,

The wonder of its resurrection

From its grave in the frozen earth.”

This is an excerpt from the fourteen-stanza poem “Nature’s Easter Music” by American poet and author, Lucy Larcom (1824 – 1893).

Ms. Larcom is known especially for her autobiographical, A New England Girlhood, and for having gone to work in the cotton mills for about ten years, starting at age eleven…She was a very popular and prolific writer. The Poetical Works of Lucy Larcom is available as a Google eBook. (Personally, I must admit I had never heard of Ms. Larcom till this post, but am now a fan. The line, “Who has tracked a dream’s beginning?”  from “The Magic Flower” has captured my imagination.)

Publisher and New York native, John Winsch (1865 – 1923) is well-known to ephemera collectors, especially for his Halloween postcards – antique and vintage Halloween anything is much sought-after today. The 1910 Federal Census for Richmond, NY shows his wife, Florence, born in Pennsylvania, about 1871, and their son, Frederick, born New York about 1905.

Sources:  Lucy Larcom. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_Larcom (accessed April 15, 2017).

Larcom, Lucy. The Poetical Works of Lucy Larcom. Boston:  Houghton Mifflin Company, 1884. (Google.com)

“John O. Winsch (1910 – 1915) Publishers – W.” (MetroPostcard.com). Accessed April 16, 2017.

Year: 1910; Census Place: Richmond Ward 2, Richmond, New York; Roll: T624_1073; Page: 4B; Enumeration District: 1315; FHL microfilm: 1375086. (Ancestry.com).

John Winsch (1865 – 1923). Find A Grave Memorial# 31161686. (Findagrave.com)

Hen And Chicks On The March

Divided back, unused postcard. Unknown Parisian publisher. Printed in France, Series or number 595. Dated by the sender:  October 1944.

Price:  $5.00

A very cute French postcard for Easter (though dated in October) showing a hen and her three chicks, marching off to une Fête de Pâques. The hen is a cut-out that is pasted on for a slight 3-D effect, and some of the card’s silver glitter still remains after seventy-three years. But we love the details:  the differing expressions for each of the feathered-four, and the red balloon, the green umbrella, the Pierrot-like clown hats worn by the chicks, and the artist’s realistic touch with the four-leaf clover….The card was, poignantly, sent home during WWII, from probably an American soldier, to his little girl, Elsa. He writes:

“Special for my sweet little daughter, Elsa-pie from her loving Daddy. France, October 1944.”

A close-up of the publisher logo appears below, but the company name is, for the moment, a mystery. For sure, that’s “Paris” at top and underneath would be “Marque Déposée”  for trademark, but what’s the first letter there…? Our best guess for the publisher initials is either T.D.A or Y.D.A.

Easter Chick For Lily V. Herrling

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“Easter Greetings”

Here’s one more official Easter postcard for this year and it’s of another chick, so adorable, wearing her little shell hat with pussy willow decoration, and carrying a little bouquet.

The sender writes:

“April 4, 1914. Fort Pierre S. Dak. Dear Miss Herlling. I will drop you a few lines this tues[?]. we all well hope you the same. the snow is all gone now and we have a nice bit of water in the…?…now. it has bin dry all winter but we will have a lot of it now for this summer & yes nellie has got a little colt one week old but lily…?…is the same color she was when you saw her. good by, by for now[?] …and…?  L. E. Datts. I will write a letter in a few days. Wishing you a joys Easter.”

Sent to:   “Miss Lily V. Herrling. Walton, Neb. % Geo. Wilson. R.F.D.”

Lily was a public school teacher who was born in Wisconsin, about 1885. The 1920 Federal Census for Sheboygan finds Lily and her sister, Elsa May, living with their brother R. B. Herrling. Various short newspaper clips can be found online, like the two below, which show that Lily traveled to various locations to teach:

From the Lincoln Daily News (Lincoln, NE) 11 June 1915:

Lincoln Daily News Jun 11 1915

From the Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, WI) 17 August 1916:

Sheboygan Press Aug 17 1916

Divided back, used postcard. Postmarked April 13 (or 3rd?) 1914, Fort Pierre, South Dakota. Publisher:  James E. Pitts. Series 42 F.

Price:  $12.00

Sources:  Year: 1920; Census Place: Greenbush, Sheboygan, Wisconsin; Roll: T625_2016; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 116; Image: 1042. (Ancestry.com)

Lincoln Daily News (Lincoln, NE) 11 June 1915. (Ancestry.com)

Sheboygan Press (Sheboygan, WI) 17 August 1916. (Ancestry.com)

Easter Joys Be Thine

Easter Joys Be Thine pc1Easter Joys Be Thine pc2

Divided back, embossed, used postcard. Postmarked in Homer, New York on March 27th, year not readable. Publisher unknown. Series or number 155. Circa 1910.

Price:  $15.00

This is a really cute one. A chick (chicks are ruling this Easter) in a large eggshell cart that is equipped with flowers for wheels, driving two white bunnies who are harnessed with pink ribbons. The chick’s riding crop is a sprig of lily of the valley. And the colors are a little unusual in the card:  The grass is more blue than green; the colors are muted but sort of like “dream” colors, not just understated but sort of “off” like you’re looking at a replay of a dream, or a badly tinted old movie or something similar. It’s very cool. Anyway, the sender writes:

“Wed. Morn. Dear Lucy. Your Aunt Martha says she will come over and stay with you for 2 weeks and do light work if you want her too. So write back soon if you want her. Pa is not feeling good, got the blues. Hope you are all well, Mother.”

Addressed to:   “Mrs. Lucy Sears, McGraw, Cortland Co. N. Y., R.D. #3.”

Lucy E., according to the 1910 Federal Census for Homer, New York, was born about 1885. She is married to George F. Sears, born about 1881. He owns a dairy farm, and the couple have two boys, Floyd A., born in 1908, and Roy L., born in 1909. Living with them and helping with the farm is George’s brother, Erastus, born about 1887. All are natives of New York. The town of Homer is about five miles northwest of McGraw, as the crow flies.

The year is not readable or didn’t get stamped when postmarked. It wouldn’t be surprising if it’s 1910, since Lucy at this time has two boys under two years old, and she could definitely use a little help.

Source:  Year: 1910; Census Place: Homer, Cortland, New York; Roll: T624_934; Page: 8B; Enumeration District: 0127; FHL microfilm: 1374947. (Ancestry.com).

Compliments Of Your Bro, M. M. Miller

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“A Happy Easter”

A beautiful postcard of – I think these are supposed to be – Easter Lilies along with a cottage scene, a gold ribbon and dramatic rays of light surrounding all. And the capital “A” in the Easter wish some shadow behind it, giving it kind of a 3-D effect.

This was sent by M. M. Miller, the same person in the prior post, and he writes:   “Compliments of your Bro. M. M. Miller to J. M. Ellison.”  

Addressed to:   “J. M. Ellison, 26 St. & Cheyenne ave, Pueblo, Colo.”

Divided back, embossed, used postcard. Postmarked March 25, 1912 from McDowell, West Virginia. Publisher unknown. Series or number B53.

Price:  $3.00