Thunderbird Park, Vancouver Island, 1958

Photo, snapshot with white border, June 1958, Vancouver Island, BC

Price:  $5.00       Size:  About 3 and 1/2 x 3 and 1/2″

Tourists in June 1958 posing at the foot of a totem pole (not sure if this particular one is still there) and in front of the Mungo Martin House which was built in 1953.

Mungo Martin. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mungo_Martin. (accessed March 14, 2020).

1950 Victoria 10th International Salon of Photography

Print of notice of photography show, October 1950.

Price:  $4.00            Size:  4 and 1/8 x 4 and 3/4″

A third in a short totem pole theme, an ad for the 10th International Salon of Photography that was probably one of many that were printed and handed out around town, at the event, or both. According to the article below, from The Victoria Daily Times, the show had both a color and black and white section. The color slide show included  “exhibits of photographers from many parts of the world”  featured 187 slides and was held in the Esquimalt Community Hall on Sturdee St., in Esquimalt Township, British Colombia.

And on the back of the ad there appears the following, a signature? which was darkened in Photoshop. Was it from anyone famous in the photography world? (Just kidding…..or maybe not.)

Source:  ” Color Photo Exhibit.”  The Victoria Daily Times. (Victoria, British Columbia) October 28, 1950. Saturday, p. 22. (Newspapers.com)

Afraid To Go Near It

Divided back, unused postcard. Artist:  William Standing. Publisher:  Dennis Delger. 1948. Western Stationery Co., Yachats, Oregon.

Price:  $7.00

“Me Too But I’m Afraid To Go Near It.”

A humorous card of a totem pole and two dogs….taken from the original etching by Indian artist, William Standing (1904 – 1951).

Source:  William Standing. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Standing (accessed March 1, 2020.).

Totems At Ketchikan Ball Park

Old photo, circa 1930s, white border.

Price:  $10.00

Yes, the focus is not great, we’ll agree with whoever it was that wrote the description on the back. There are a few commercial photos (a good thing, for sure!) that we found online, that are much better, and actually show the rest of the poles that were standing to our left as we gaze into the shot. But there’s always something about an image from someone’s personal camera, well for one thing, because they’re unique (excepting the person made duplicates, of course) and probably also because we get a sense of being with that one individual as they took the photo, so it seems more personal.

Screen shot below right, from a Google search shows one such commercial photo, for sale on eBay, as of our post going up today. The photographer’s surname was Schallerer.

But the curious thing (to anyone who may not know the history of the city) is that there was a baseball field at the park that was comprised of part of the beach, which was underwater when the tide was in. We’re not sure where the ball field was in relation to the totems, but apparently the tide flats were the best place (at the time) to host games, due to the topography of the area.

Below, a January 1932 clipping from a Bristol, Tennessee newspaper regarding the end of the tide-flats ball field. And we appreciate the unknown author’s turn of a phrase, conjuring images of ballplayers that had been……

Cavorting in water up to their knees

Sources:  Google.com screen shot result for search under “old photos by Schallerer of Ketchikan.” March 1, 2020.

“Alaska ‘Tide’ Ball Park to Wet No More Players.”  The Bristol Herald Courier. (Bristol, TN). January 2, 1932. Saturday, p. 5. (Newspapers.com).

Allen, June. “100 Years of Baseball in Ketchikan!” Stories in the News. April 26, 2003, Saturday 12:30 a.m. http://www.sitnews.net/JuneAllen/Baseball/042603_100_years.html. Accessed March 1, 2020.

http://www.sitnews.net/JuneAllen/Baseball/042603_100_years.html