Ice Breakup In Fairbanks, Alaska

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Vintage photo, Cushman Street bridge and Ice Breakup, Fairbanks, AK. Circa 1920s – 1940s.

Price:  $7.00          Size:  3 and 1/2 x 2 and 1/2″

You can see the spire of Immaculate Conception Church that, from this angle, is appearing behind Samson’s Hardware store. The church, built in 1905, is listed on the National Registry of Historic Sites and was originally located on the other side of the river. It was hauled over the ice on skids (logs or planks) to its present location in 1911 so it would be close to the hospital that had been built a few years prior. And that’s the Cushman Street bridge, built in 1917, that is spanning the Chena River. Samson’s, in business since the Gold Rush days (now Sampson’s True Value) relocated in 2010 about a mile and a half west of the site it occupies above. Here’s an image from Alaska’s Digital Archives showing a somewhat similar view of the store (note the long windows) as well as partial views of the church spire and bridge.

Sources:  “Fairbanks – Immaculate Conception Catholic Church.” Diocese of Fairbanks. Missionaries in the last frontier. (Web accessed August 12, 2016.)

Cole, Dermot. “Historic Samson Hardware celebrates grand opening at new store.” Newsminer.com, May 22, 2010. (Web accessed August 12, 2016.)

Photo of “Sled dog team on Chena River in Fairbanks.” Alaska’s Digital Archives. (Web accessed August 12, 2016.)

Writing Home From France

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I’d been looking for something to put up for Memorial Day and so this and the following post are a little late. It sounds like the author of this little note to his Mom would have made it back home just fine (and we pray he did) but just in remembrance of those men and women who’ve served and had not…..here’s a postcard showing Saint-Aignan (Loir et Cher) – Vue Générale et le Pont, written shortly before the end of WWI. The sender writes:

“Aug. 27, 1918.  E.E.F.  Dearest Mother, I’m fine and dandy, how are you? This is the town I am at. This is a beautiful river I go swimming there quite often. On the left hand corner is the church I spoke to you about last Sunday. You can’t see half of it. Had a lovely time Sunday the boys…”

It sounds like there may have been another page or two after the above, unless he meant “with the boys.” And that is the River Cher that our guy goes swimming in, and the Collegiate Church of St. Aignan that he’s mentioning, on the left.

The publisher logo appearing on the back, top left, shows the letters IPM. The words surrounding the letters are hard to make out, except for “Paris.”

Divided back postcard, unused with writing. Dated August 27, 1918. Publisher:  IPM, Paris, France.

Price:  $4.00

Happy Be Thy Birthday

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“The wish of thy friend is

Happy be thy Birthday”

 

Per musings from the prior post, here’s another card with the often seen stone bridge. A simple design in a fancy frame:  a winter scene with red bridge over a stream and a red house that’s supposed to be further in the background. One of the Lena Davis collection, and the sender wrote:

“Oct. 4, 1912. Dear Cousin. Many happy birthday greetings from Mr. and Mrs. C. Haney[?]”

Addressed to:   “Miss Lena Davis. Almena, Kans. R. F. D. #3”

And what almost went unnoticed was the publisher info which barely appears from under the postage stamp, indicating Copyright E. Nash.

Last but not least, this same design with a different message shows up on another card in the same collection.

Divided back, embossed, used postcard. Postmarked October 5, 1912 from Elwood, Nebraska. Publisher:  E. Nash. Landscape Series, No. 16B.

Price:  $3.00

May You Always Know

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“May you always know the

enjoyment of happiness

that comes from true friends.”

Another from The Lena Davis Collection. By publisher E. Nash and showing a framed winter scene of a river with a red bridge and red house further in the background. The sender wrote:

“Long Island. Dec. 11. Dear Cousin, We got home o.k. about six. We picked up Newt Miller in Almena and took him to the Island he said he had been to the burg. We picked up Babe at Hays and drove her the rest of the way home. We had lots of fun.”

Sent to:   “Miss Lena Davis, Almena, Kan.”

Almena is about ten miles southwest of Long Island, and there’s a Hays, Kansas about 100 miles south of Long Island. Wonder how long it would have taken them in 1913. It sounds like it was just a day trip, but on the other hand perhaps Hays is a person. It’s interesting that Long Island is referred to as “the Island.”

See another in the Lena Davis Collection with the same design but different message.

Divided back, embossed, used postcard. Postmarked December 11, 1913 from Long Island, Kansas. Publisher:  E. Nash. Number or Series:  G-16.

Price:  $3.00

View Of Cincinnati, Ohio in 1906

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A view of Cincinnati, Ohio, looking south from Mount Adams, circa 1906:  This is the fifth postcard we’ve found for the Dr. Oswald Henning Collection. (See prior posts for more information.) They were all in the same dealer’s collection for sale at an antique and vintage paper fair in California. However, they were not all together, and at the time they were purchased, the relationship between Oswald Henning and Helen Muirhead was unknown. So, it’s really unusual and interesting that they were chosen that day out of thousands in the dealer’s collection. Helen and Oswald were married on June 30, 1906, in Chicago. See the first in this series, entitled The Lake, Belle Isle Park, Detroit, Michigan for more information. As you can see, this card was postmarked only ten days before the couple got married! The card was addressed to:  “Miss Helen Muirhead, 901 Hamilton Court, Chicago.”  Oswald dated the card on the top right and he wrote:

“Dear Helen – Homeward Bound – Can hardly wait am so anxious to see you all again. Oswald”  and at top left he added,  “Am obliged to lay over here for four long hours.”

The bridge on our left appears to be the L&N (Louisville & Nashville) Railroad Bridge, which was first opened under the name of the Newport & Cincinnati Bridge, on April 1, 1872. The name changed to the L&N in 1904. The bridge was rehabilitated (and painted purple) and in 2003 re-opened for pedestrians only under the name of the Newport Southbank Bridge but is commonly called “The Purple People Bridge.”

The bridge on our right appears to be the Central Bridge (Cincinnati Newport Bridge) which opened in 1890 and was demolished in 1992. In it’s place today is the Taylor Southgate Bridge. Don’t let the church steeples in the photo fool you when you look at the Central:  They almost line up with the bridge’s two highest points.

Undivided back, used postcard. Postmarked June 20, 1906 from Cincinnati, Ohio. Publisher:  The Cincinnati News Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. Printed in Berlin, Germany by Leipzig. No. 3216.

Price:  $20.00

Sources:  Crowley, Patrick. “Meet the Purple People Bridge.” The Purple People Bridge. Web accessed November 16, 2014. [http://www.purplepeoplebridge.com/History/tabid/536/Default.aspx]

Mecklenborg, Jake. “Central Bridge.”  Cincinnati-transit.net. Web accessed November 16, 2014. [http://www.cincinnati-transit.net/central.html]

Views On Indian Creek, Dallas, Missouri

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“Views On Indian Creek, Dallas, near Kansas City, MO.”

Beautiful postcard with Art Nouveau lines and what appears to be tinted photos of three views near Kansas City, Missouri of:  Indian Creek, the bridge over Indian Creek, and Watkin’s Mill, built 1833.

Watkin’s Woolen Mill is a National Historic Landmark and a National Mechanical Engineering Landmark. The Missouri State Parks website explains that this woolen mill was the only one of 2,400 textile mills in 1870, that still contained it’s original machinery and equipment.

The publisher for this one (and the following post) is the Elite Post Card Company of Kansas City, Missouri. According to the Metropolitan Postcard Club of New York City, this publisher did views of the Midwest, and operated from about 1908 – 1914. They may have been having some struggles or started winding down by 1912 though, as a September 1, 1912 publication gives a short newsworthy note that the company was “petitioned into bankruptcy.”

Divided back, unused postcard. Publisher:  The Elite Post Card Co., Kansas City, Missouri. Made in the U.S.A.  Number/series:  157.  A-16684. Circa 1908 – 1914.

Price:  $8.00

Sources:  http://mostateparks.com/page/55172/parkhistoric-site-plans

http://www.metropostcard.com/publisherse.html

The Bookseller, Newsdealer and Stationer, Vol. 37. New York, September 1, 1912. p. 160. Web. (Google eBooks)

Greetings From Edinburgh, Scotland

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Beautiful postcard from 1949 Edinburgh, Scotland showing scenes of St. Giles’ Cathedral, The Forth Bridge, Princes Street – West End, and Edinburgh Castle and Art Galleries. In the center is a lovely profile of a Scottish Terrier above a sheaf of heather (one of the national flowers) tied with a bow. The card is addressed to:

“Mr. & Mrs. George Hume, 2100 Virginia Street, Berkeley California U. S. A.”

The sender wrote,  “Hello Ella & George. Having a very lovely time. Have seen quite a few of our old friends. Best Regards  Annie[?]”

Divided back, used postcard. Postmarked May 2, 1949 from Edinburgh, Scotland. Publisher unknown. Printed in England. Series or number 23A.

Availability status:  Digital image only. $3.00. The original is in a friend’s collection.

Friendly Greetings

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“The memory of our good old times will never fade away,

In proof of which I’m sending this greeting to-day.”

This is a beautiful card, on linen-type paper, showing  “Friendly Greetings”  at the top and the above short verse, both done in gold-tone. Whether the card is handmade or not is a good question; maybe not as the edges are also done in gold-tone, which might leave one with the impression that the card was professionally made and sold; but then again there is no publisher information, so the card could have even been created by the sender. In any case, the scene is beautifully done, and shows a small stone bridge in winter, with the top half of a house showing in the background, nestled cozily in front of some fir trees, at sunset or sunrise. The message on the back shows:

“Dear Maud, I am wondering if you, Oria, and I could have a reunion again. Would it be possible for you to come down Saturday night and stay over Sunday? We are writing to Oria to do the same. The children will all be at home and we can all have a good old fashion visit. Lovingly, Belle   Please let me know by return mail if possible.”

We can tell this is an older card by the spelling of “to-day” rather than today. A great website for etymology was found and is listed below. Etymology is the study of the origin of words and how their meanings have changed over time. The term in the spotlight here started off as “to day”, changed to “to-day”, then became the present “today.” The hyphenated term was used roughly up until the early 20th century, but we still sometimes see “to day” around this time, as well.

Greeting card, possibly hand-made. Circa early 1900s.

Price:  $15.00

Source:  http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=today

Greetings From Fenton, Michigan

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Beautifully done, non-divided back postcard, printed in Germany, showing purple clematis and a scene perhaps designed to resemble a painting on unfurled canvas of a stone bridge over a river, with mountains in the background.  The caption  “Greetings from Fenton Mich.”  appears in cursive glitter. A stunning postcard.

Addressed to:  “Mrs. Mary E. Beale, 211 Kerr st. North, Lansing, Mich.”

Mary E. Beale, born Canada (of Scottish descent) about 1872, appears on the 1910 Federal Census taken in Lansing, with husband Charles F. Beale, born Michigan, about 1874, along with their son, Stanley, born Michigan, about 1905, and Charles’ mother Mary A. Beale, born New Jersey, about 1835. Charles’ occupation is listed as Picture Framer, and the address given on this census is 213 Kerr. There is no writing on the front (or back) indicating who the sender was. (We wonder if the choice of postcards had anything to do with Charles’ occupation.)

Undivided back postcard, printed in Germany. Postmarked from Lansing, Michigan, July 5, 1906. Publisher A. & M. B. (Albrecht & Meister of Berlin) No. 462.

Price:  $25.00

Source:  Year: 1910; Census Place: Lansing Ward 5, Ingham, Michigan; Roll: T624_651; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 0072; FHL microfilm: 1374664. (Ancestry.com)

San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge

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According to a Wikipedia entry, this bridge (known locally as “The Bay Bridge”) still has one of the longest spans in the world. Construction started in 1933, and the bridge was opened to traffic on November 12, 1936. Since this postcard states this was the longest bridge in the world, it brought up the question:  What is the longest bridge in the world today? This depends on how you look at it. Do you count from beginning to end, or just the part over the water if water is involved? But just for contrast to the 8 1/2 miles listed for The Bay Bridge, the DanYang-Kunshan Grand Bridge in China, according to another Wikipedia entry, is 102.4 miles long, 5.6 miles of which is over open water.

Divided back, unused linen postcard. Circa 1936 – 1945. Publisher:  Scenic View Card Co., 667 Mission St., San Francisco, California. “Nature Tone Views.” #43.

Price:  $7.00

Sources:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco%E2%80%93Oakland_Bay_Bridge

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danyang%E2%80%93Kunshan_Grand_Bridge