Dutch Woman In Traditional Headdress

Postcard, unused. Photographer:  A. W. Verschoore de la Hoiussaye. Lange Vorststraat – Goes. Telf 44. Platen blijven voor nabestelling bewaard. Circa late 1910s – 1920s.

Price:  To be determined

That last line above, in the photographer’s information on the reverse, translates to “Records will be kept for reordering.” Lange Vorststraat, is the name of the street (literally translating to “long frost street”) in the city of Goes, province of Zeeland, Netherlands.

Photographer Adriaan Willem Verschoore de la Hoiussaye (sometimes spelled Houssaije) was born November 18, 1896 in either Middelburg or Den Bosch, Netherlands and died August 10, 1981. As of the date of this web post, we’re seeing only one other possible postcard (a digital) example from the website, Saving Photography (wonderful photos on this site, see link below in Sources) but we’ve just reached out to someone who will hopefully be able to help determine this postcard’s potential value.

We see a beautiful young woman (love that direct, soul-searching gaze) in short sleeves with a shoulder wrap of gingham and embroidered border; a carefully arranged bolero necklace fastened with a small, perhaps silver or gold medal; seven strands of possibly coral beads covering her neck; and a white cap fanning out into a grand display of starched lace, framing the subject’s face, and extending all the way past her shoulders – as if the head covering could have been worn down and flowing but, of course, is pulled up and starched to show off the work and identify the location that this young lady was from (or was modeling for). The lacework is gorgeous, no surprise, but click the image twice to enlarge, and you’ll notice some parallel lines running out toward the border on our left, and more lines on our right. Looking at the artist’s patterns – something about them reminds me of angels’ wings or maybe feathers.

I have no idea what the small flag-type things are, one dark, and one light, that are on each side of the woman’s forehead – some part of the traditional costume, it would seem, and maybe they help to fasten the headdress. An expert in the field of traditional folk wear could give us a much better description than I’ve attempted to do here, but I have to say that, were I twenty again (sorry, not trying to cop out on the age thing) I would love to take up this field of study. Maybe as a hobby in upcoming retirement, though!

Sources:  A. W. Verschoore de la Hoiussaye, Dutch Photographer. https://peoplepill.com/people/a-w-verschoore-de-la-houssaye/ (accessed November 17, 2020).

Zeeuws Archief; Den Haag, Nederland; BS Birth. Ancestry.com. Netherlands, Birth Index, 1784-1917.

“Portrait of an unknown lady.” Saving Photography. https://www.nl12.nl/saving-photography/#jp-carousel-3107 (accessed November 17, 2020).

Pornic – Coiffure de l’ancien Temps

Divided back, unused postcard. Series or number 81. Photographer or printer/publisher:  L.L. Circa 1920.

Price:  $7.00

Addressed to:   “Mrs. Alex. Martin. Paris.”

“Dear Mrs. Martin, Many thanks for the lovely card and those you gave to Maman. The old women here are like this one. I will look for some others costumes for in Bretagne there are numerous. Best love from your very affectionate Jeannette.”

By coincidence, the prior post was also signed with “Best love.”  Notable also is the unusual way that Jeannette writes the capital letters M and P. And this card had apparently come from another collection, before making its way to ours, as evidenced by the handwriting “638.  Headdress of older time.”  There’s another postcard site that also has a card of this same design right now, and that one has a particular date in 1920, hence the circa date for ours.

Last, but certainly not least, and without going into great detail, the beautiful woman from Pornic, Brittany, France, featured on this card is decidedly someone you would want to have a conversation with – kind and with a great sense of humor. Which brings up the question – who were the individuals that came to be featured as “types” from a certain area on the numerous cards that had circulated at one time? How did they come to have their photographs taken, and were they always paid for their time by the photographer? Looking into these questions might involve heavy research so we’ll not jump at this bait (tempting, though), but it would be nice to happen across the info at some time or another.

Source:  Pornic. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pornic (accessed November 14, 2020).

To Bobby From Aunt Lorilee

Divided back, used postcard. Postmarked July 21, 1951, Interlaken, Switzerland. Publisher:  Photoglob-Wehrli A. G., Zurich. Number or series z 2525.

Price:  $6.00

Berner Bueb

“07/21/51     Hi Bobby! You should have been with us today when we had lunch on the Jungfrau, one of the highest mountains in Europe. You would have loved to play in the snow in the summertime! Have fun! Love, Aunt Lorilee.”

Addressed to:   “Master Bobby Burkhardt, 10629 Garden Way, Spring Valley, California, U.S.A.”

The Jungfrau is in the Bernese Alps in Switzerland. The postcard caption “Berner Bueb” might be translated as Bernese boy. You can find numerous Swiss postcards with “Berner Bueb” and “Berner Bueb und Meitschi” (Bernese boy and girl, we’re guessing.) This postcard appears to be an artist-signed card per the front lower left corner which shows “Blank.” Checking in Ancestry.com Blank shows as a German and Swiss surname. According to another postcard site, this card was produced at least as early as 1946.

Sources:  Jungfrau. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jungfrau (accessed April 20, 2019).

“Ziege Kuenstlerkarte Blank Berner Bueb Kat. Tiere.” https://oldthing.de/Ziege-Kuenstlerkarte-Blank-Berner-Bueb-Kat-Tiere-0024001456. (accessed April 20, 2019).

Handsome Scot In Full Dress Attire

Old photo, white border. Circa 1920s.

Price:  $7.00        Size:  About 2 and 5/8 x 4 and 7/16″

I’m guessing this photo is from the 1920s, or maybe late 1910s, due to the look of the gentlemen in non-traditional wear. Where was the photo taken? That’s a mystery, though if we could focus in on the big sign above the fence that could be a colossal clue (even if it’s advertisement). And what was the occasion? Unknown, but maybe part of a Highland games festival. That’s a sporran (purse in Gaelic) that the man wears below the belt, essential since kilts have no pockets.

Source:  Sporran. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sporran (accessed August 5, 2018).

Filipina In Baro’t Saya, Real Photo Postcard

Divided back, unused Real Photo Postcard. Juan Dela Cruz Studio. AZO stamp box, circa 1924 – 1949.

Price:  $12.00

A beautiful young woman in the traditional Filipino dress, baro’t saya, is posing for this portrait that was taken at the Juan Dela Cruz Studio. An unrelated online image was found on Flickr listing this studio location as Tondo, Manila, Philippines, and with an estimated date for that image as 1927. Our photo above of the unknown beauty may have been taken around this time, as well. The broader time frame of circa 1924 – 1949 comes from the AZO stamp box style on the reverse of the card.

The sender of this RPPC signed the back of the postcard but unfortunately, her signature is mostly covered by the black photo album paper the card had been glued to. We can only read what looks like the last two letters of her name (e-t). She wrote:

“Dear Aquiong, A Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year. Lovingly….”

Sources:  Ensemble-Philippines-The Met. Metropolitan Museum of Art. https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/158138. (accessed December 30, 2017).

De Leon, Eduardo. “A studio portrait of a Filipina named Loleng. Juan Dela Cruz Studio, Tondo, Manila. 1927.” 25 Nov 2014. Online image. Flickr. 30 Dec 2017. https://www.flickr.com/photos/edlei/15695528537/in/photostream/

“Real Photo Postcard Stamp Boxes ” AZO (squares in all four corners). Playle.com. (accessed December 30, 2017).

Women In Greek Costume

Divided back, unused Greek postcard. Publisher:  Delta, Athens, Greece. Circa 1960s.

Price:  $3.00     Size:  4 x 5 and 13/16″

Just something to go with the prior post, for Greece….specifically regarding the traditional dress of Ίωάννινα or Ioannina in English, though the photo was actually taken near Acropolis at Athens. See the comment on this post from Maria.

Publisher Delta Editions was owned by Emmanuel Diakakis & Son. Address:  4 Apelou St., Athens. Greece.  “Έμμ. Διακάκης & Υίός – Άπελλοϋ – 4 – Τηλ – Άδήυαι.”

Source:  Ioannina. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ioannina (accessed April 2, 2017).

Brigit O’Quinn, Banada, County Sligo

Brigit OQuinn pc1Brigit OQuinn pc2

Divided back, unused postcard. “Carta Puist.” Circa 1911. Printed by Malcolm & Hayes, New York. Publisher:  The Gaelic League. Photo by Anna Frances Levins. Number or series 30249.

Availability status:  SOLD  (High resolution digital image sold and to be included in book soon to be published).

“Brigit O’Quinn, Banada, Co. Sligo. 15th Century Irish Costume.”

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day!

Cardcow has this postcard showing a postmark year 1911. Ha, this is crazy (great) as the sender on the Cardcow card has written,  “This is one of the three colleens that have been staying with us…”   (For some reason I was thinking that maybe Brigit O’Quinn was a figure in Irish history and the photo represented her, so to speak. Must of been the beautiful traditional outfit or maybe the hairstyle.) And, normally, we’re researching photos of people that were born elsewhere and emigrated to the U.S., so this one is like a flip, sort of, born and lives elsewhere, visiting the States. Nice! Anyway, Cardcow’s card was postmarked from Butte, Montana. And so, we find a newspaper article online that appeared in the Anaconda Standard, (Anaconda, Montana) July 12, 1911:   “Miss Brigit O’Quinn, accompanied by Miss Noone, gave an Irish jig in a manner that kept the audience applauding for several minutes at its completion.”

More to follow shortly on this post, as I’m out of time this morning…..

The next day….Here’s the clipping mentioned above and several more, showing that the three colleens, the Misses Bridie MacLoughlin, Eileen Noone and Brigit O’Quinn were on tour, visiting, among other places, Montana, Yellowstone National Park, Oregon and Kansas.

Miss Noone PianistExhibitMiss Eileen NooneMaking Limerick Lace

The trio, in the company of the Reverend Michael O’Flanagan and Fionian MacColum (The Gaelic League’s American envoys mentioned in the second clip above) returned home via Liverpool, England, on the passenger ship Adriatic, leaving New York and arriving in Liverpool August 2, 1912. The ladies’ estimated ages per the ship list are:  Bridie, age 30; Bridget, age 35 and Eileen, age 27. Below, a crop from the passenger list.

Onboard Adriatic Aug 1912

Sources:  “Miss Noone, Pianist.”  The Anaconda Standard. (Anaconda, Montana) 12 Jul 1911, Wed, p. 5. (Newspapers.com)

“Exhibit of Irish Industries Opens Tomorrow Morning.” The Oregon Daily Journal (Portland, Oregon). 21 Aug 1911, Mon. p. 16. (Newspapers.com)

“Gaelic League’s Exhibit Irish Industries.” (photo of Eileen Noone) The Oregon Daily Journal (Portland, Oregon). 21 Aug 1911, Mon. p. 16. (Newspapers.com)

“The Irish Industries Exhibit.” (photo of Brigit McQuinn). The Wichita Beacon (Wichita, Kansas) 26 Jun 1912, Wed. p. 3. (Newspapers.com)

The National Archives of the UK; Kew, Surrey, England; Board of Trade: Commercial and Statistical Department and successors: Inwards Passenger Lists.; Class: BT26; Piece: 528; Item: 12. (Ancestry.com)

Srdečné Přání

Srdecne Prani pc1Srdecne Prani pc2

Divided back, artist-signed, unused postcard. Stamp box shows “Made in Tchécoslovakia.” Publisher:  F.O.P.  Series or number 21.

Price:  $10.00

A Czech postcard expressing  “Srdečné přání ”  or “Heartfelt wishes.” This may be from the same era (1930s?) as the card in the prior post, and is also an artist-signed card. The artist’s initials show on the front as “K.Š.”

This is another for the mystery category, the publisher with the logo of a pine or fir tree, above the initials, “F.O.P.” in a circle, and with three shield-looking emblems, was not found, nor were any references to the artist. We’ll be on the lookout for more at the next big postcard show coming up in April.

Magyar Népviselet

Magyar Nepviselet pc1Magyar Nepviselet pc2

Divided back, artist-signed, unused postcard. Made in Hungary. Series or number 320.

Price:  $10.00

An artist-signed postcard, maybe from the 1930s? There is another postcard showing up online with the same type of reverse that the seller listed as circa 1930s. But nothing was found on the artist. The name appears to be Taubert? or something similar, (this one will go in our Mystery category for the unknown artist) but it’s a very cute image of a little girl in Hungarian national costume, holding some potted geraniums. In looking for the artist or a possible similar card, and Googling Hungarian national costumes….Oh, heaven! The colors and patterns, the embroidery, it’s all just so beautiful. (And why don’t we dress like this today if we want to?) I’m inspired!

Scottish Lass Trade Card

Scottish Lass Trade Card tc1

Victorian Era trade card. Washington registered trade mark. Circa 1889 – 1890s. Condition:  Poor, regrettably, due to top middle piece having become torn away from the whole; creases in top and bottom left corners; top right corner missing.

Size:  4 and 1/2 x 6 and 1/2″

Price:  $7.00

A beautiful red-haired lassie in Rob Roy MacGregor-Black (?) plaid skirt and jacket, and a tam-o-shanter with red wings, holds a peacock feather-designed fan. She is posed standing on a path in the forest, with her arm draped protectively around a lamb, who rests just next to her on a grassy ledge. Girl and lamb are looking off to their right. The design ends up to be a little comical – it appears that the lamb wears a little pointed hat (!) but really that is just the bonny lassie’s arm showing through her sleeve – her long sleeves being slit almost up to the shoulder. Very stylish!

At the bottom of this Victorian Era trade card is the wording:   Washington. And then in smaller print, “Trade Mark Registered.”  What is meant by Washington? Our best guess is that it’s one of a series of cards for each state in the Union. Washington became as state November 11, 1889.