An tAonach Gaelach (The Irish Fair)

I had this little Useful Irish Phrases card hanging around since the days of studying Irish, so thought why not put it up here? I will never forget being stunned listening to my first instruction cassette tape (yep, lol, the days of cassettes) as hearing certain phrases on the tape hit me with a really strong déjà vu feeling, as if I’d spoken the language in the past. This card is from former teacher and friend, Mike.

Glendalough, County Wicklow, Ireland, Aerial View

Divided back, unused postcard. Publisher: Dúchas. Circa 1995 – 2003.

Price:  $1.00        Size:  About 6 and 3/4 x 5 and 3/4″

Gleann Dá Loch, Co. Chill Mhantáin. Radharc ón Aer. An Roinn Ealaíon, Oidhreachta, Gaeltachta agus Oileán. Department of Arts, Heritage, Gaeltacht and the Islands. Series or number 53.

For St. Patrick’s Day, just a quick newer postcard to start off a short Ireland theme….The publisher is Dúchas – The Heritage Service and per the short Wiki article they were not around very long, so this postcard would be dated from about 1995 to 2003.

“The Monastic City”

This card shows an aerial view of the ancient Christian monastic site founded by St. Kevin in the 6th century. Most of the buildings date from the 10th through 12th centuries.

Sources:  Dúchas. n.d. (accessed March 17, 2018).

Glendalough Monastic City – Ireland’s Ancient East. (accessed March 17, 2017).

The Battertons In 1909

Divided back, Real Photo Postcard, unused. AZO stamp box.

Price:  $15.00

“Grandfather & Grandmother Edgar & Margaret & Jennie Batterton taken Sept 1st 1909.”

As near as we can figure, that is to say, no other Batterton families match up as well, this image shows left to right:  William Edgar Batterton, born 1876 in Missouri, with his wife Jean A. “Jennie”, born about 1886 in Ontario, Canada, Edgar’s parents David L. Batterton, born about 1848 in Missouri and Nancy Margaret (Cromwell) Batterton, born 1848 in Missouri and the youngest Batterton, Jean Margaret, born 1908 in Manitoba, Canada. The Canadian connection may have been established by David L. Batterton:  A homestead grant record shows for David dated 1902.

Adding credibility

A little more credibility for our educated guess on the specific family:  Edgar’s WWI Draft Registration card shows his date of birth as November 25, 1876, living in Minneapolis, wife listed as nearest relative, and his build is described as stout (matches the photo) and eyes blue (not discrepant) though his hair by this time had become gray. He is listed on this record as a naturalized citizen of Canada.

A paid gig

It’s always fun to try to read any books or signs or anything else with wording that might be, by chance (or not) in a photo. This one shows the grandmother holding one of Eastman Kodak’s periodicals Studio Light. Underneath the title is Aristo Eagle, the name of another photographic journal which must have, by that time, been incorporated into Studio Light. The Eagle was earlier published by the American Aristotype Co. out of Jamestown, New York. So, the image for our RPPC was almost certainly taken by a professional photographer, rather than by friend or family, and we picture him making sure (as always, making provisions for fidgety children) the baby had something to hold, if needed.

Sources:  “United States Census, 1880,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : 16 August 2017), Edgar Batterton in household of David L Batterton, Butte City, Deer Lodge, Montana, United States; citing enumeration district ED 10, sheet 106A, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0742; FHL microfilm 1,254,742.

“United States World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” database with images, FamilySearch ( : 12 December 2014), William Edgar Batterton, 1917-1918; citing Minneapolis City no 10, Minnesota, United States, NARA microfilm publication M1509 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,675,682.

Year: 1920; Census Place: Minnetonka, Hennepin, Minnesota; Roll: T625_839; Page: 19B; Enumeration District: 264. (

Google eBook Studio Light. Vol. 11, March 1919, No. 1. (

“Great Aristo Lamp.” Belvidere Daily Republican. (Belvidere, Illinois) May 18, 1905, Thursday, p. 3. (

A Beaming Boy

Old photo, circa 1930s – 1940s.

Price:  $4.00        Size:  About 4 x 6″

I love this photo – such a charming kid! No name, location or date on this one either (like the last post) so no hope to trace a name to a current family, but still, impossible to resist. It was found either at one of the paper shows my friend and I like to frequent or at an antique store, loose in a bin. The time frame’s a guess of 1930s or 1940s. Besides that very engaging smile, I like the way he’s off center in the photo, the rolled up sleeves, the somewhat slicked up hair for the photo (nice style, very GQ) and the tie, slightly askew.

Girl With A Parasol

Photo in cardboard folding frame. Photographer unknown. Glossy finish, Velox paper. Circa late 1920s – 1940s.

Price:  $10.00       Size including frame:  About 4 and 1/2 x 8 and 1/2″

Multiple layers for photo detecting

The Velox marks that appear on the back of the photograph indicate the time frame was maybe around late 1920s – ’40s. But this one has a lot of other clues, too, though it feels like we’re dancing around the answer without quite finding it:  We looked at the cardboard frame style, the dress, the striped knee socks, the floral pattern of the Japanese-style paper parasol, the metal folding chair, the shoes (Mary Janes with a alligator pattern around the heal, very snazzy by the way) and the hairstyle. And then for location, the foliage (No, we didn’t really get that crazy. But, that is a tree trunk we’re seeing behind the umbrella, not a blur in the image.) My feeling is 1930s for the era, but we’ll update it later if a better estimate comes around. And then the girl….a great girl. We don’t know her name, but wasn’t this a nice captured moment of happiness?

Source:  Messier, Paul. “Notes on Dating Photographic Paper.” p. 125. Topics in Photographic Preservation, Volume 11. 2005, Photographic Materials Group of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works. (accessed March 3, 2018).