Picking Flower, Near Mississippi Headwaters, Minnesota

Divided back, unused, Real Photo Postcard. Circa 1950s.

Price:  $15.00

This Real Photo Postcard is one of (at least) four that we see that had been taken, circa 1950s, of an Indian woman named Picking Flower. The other three vintage cards are currently on ebay:  One shows a very similar view to the photo taken for this card, and the other two show Picking Flower standing at the Headwaters of the Mississippi River, Minnesota, with captions. My guess is that she’s Chippewa, a.k.a. Ojibwe or Ojibwa, and it’s possible she might have been a member of the Mississippi River Band Chippewas, but of course, that is mere speculation. The artwork of flowers and leaves that she’s working on (or more likely it was some finished work that was used for the photo shoot) and that which adorns her dress, is very distinctive to Chippewa beadwork design (not to mention stunningly beautiful). Here’s a quick screen shot of a Google search for examples (note the similarity in the top right design to that in the postcard.)

And, if you enlarge the postcard image, you’ll notice the little pair of moccasins that’s attached to the dress (on her left) and the shells interspersed in the shoulder areas. Always the case, we get to wondering about the circumstances surrounding a photo session, about the person themselves, how they felt at the time, what the rest of their life was like. I think Picking Flower is maybe in her 50s, from the graying hair we note, and she looks like she was squinting a little from the sun, when the photo was taken.

Sources:  Mississippi River Band of Chippewa Indians. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mississippi_River_Band_of_Chippewa_Indians (accessed May 21, 2017).

“Images of Chippewa beadwork”  Google.com search. (accessed May 21, 2017).

Theresa and Albert Bayard, Oakland CA, 1910

Set of two:  Divided Back, Real Photo Postcards, unused with writing, circa 1910. Velox stamp box.

Price for the pair:  $20.00

Postcards, year 1910, from Kristofa Bayard, 4212 Suter St., Oakland, Cal…showing her children, adorable Albert (her Big Boy) and her beautiful daughter, Theresa…

Albert Bayard

“This is my big Boy.   4214 Sutter. I found out last night that the Party in the litle House has paid their rent in full & that mens [means] there time vill bee up October 16nt. & the big House Otto says he like to go & see vhat needs fixing, so I exspict him to go to Valljo [Vallejo] sunday. Vell vi got home O.K. but tired none of the folks home exspectet us home, if you can come & see me Monday Vi vould then be able to tell you all about how things are. respectfully, Kristofa.  Best regards from Theresa & Papa.”

Albert and Theresa Bayard

“4212 Sutter St.  Dear friend. I got your letter. vill go to Vallejo Monday or Tuesday. vill bring the pieses for the stove. Vi are verry sorry to hear you baby tok so sick, vi only hope she is all over it by this time. hope this vil find you boot vell, Kristofa.  Best regards from All.”

The 1910 Federal Census for Brooklyn Township, Oakland, Alameda County, California shows the Bayard family:  William O. Bayard (Otto William Bayard in other records), born Sweden about 1863, his wife Kristofa (here spelled Christofa) born Norway about 1877 (emigrating about 1895 – 1900 per census’) Theresa, born California about 1904, and Albert, born California (aged 1 and 10/12) born June 1908. Otto is working for the railroad as a painter, at this time. The Suter house is owned by the family, and unless the house number changed, it looks like that particular structure is no longer there (a newer house, said to have been built in 1921, stands in its place). The 1920 Federal Census shows the Bayards as owners at 3916 Suter (a different house, unless there was re-numbering) and that home still exists today. Also, by this time we see the couple’s third child, Mervin Bayard, born California about 1914.

California marriage records show that Theresa married New Jersey native, Thomas Harper Ridge, in November 1921; bride and groom’s address at time of marriage was the 3916 Suter home. Kristofa’s maiden name is listed as Nelson (Nilson per Ancestry family trees). Plenty of other records can be found for the Bayards but we’ll stop here…Just to want to let year 1910 soak in…the priceless images of the children, the beautiful lace for the background (was it hand-made, or at least all-natural?) the mentions of the big house and the little house (good for them, that they owned more than one place) and Kristofa….beautiful wife, mom and friend. Of course, the stand-out in her writing is the replacement of the “w” for the “v” sound (and other evidence of English as second language)….but so nice to read, giving us a real feel for the Bayard’s Norwegian-Swedish-American household at this time.

Sources:   Year: 1910; Census Place: Oakland Ward 7, Alameda, California; Roll: T624_71; Page: 14A; Enumeration District: 0026; FHL microfilm: 1374084. (Ancestry.com)

Year: 1920; Census Place: Oakland, Alameda, California; Roll: T625_91; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 132; Image: 158. (Ancestry.com)

Marriage records, select counties and years. California State Archives, Sacramento, California. (Ancestry.com)

Anna E. Lincoln, Hubbardton, VT, 1907

Undivided back, Real Photo postcard. Postmarked May 18, 1907 from East Hubbardton, Vermont.

Price:  $12.00

“Anna E. Lincoln. Born Oct. 17, 1906.   All usually well, Ella.”  Addressed to:

“Mrs. D. I. Paine, Saratoga, N. Y., 26 East Van Dam Street.”

Anna, the cute baby girl in this RPPC, was found on the 1910 Federal Census for Hubbardton, Rutland County, VT, with mom, Ella M. and dad, Dauley (Dawley) F. Lincoln, and Anna’s older sisters, Jennie M. and Violet I. Lincoln. They are living with Dawley’s parents, William F. and Susan A. Lincoln. Also in the household are Addie L. Lincoln, daughter-in-law to William and Susan, and Addie’s two children, Arthur E. and William H. Lincoln. All are Vermont natives. Though the photo’s a little blurry, there’s some nice detail in wood and fabric to be seen on the chairs. (Are you picturing them being hauled outside?) The one on our right looks like a rocker. And this “two seats, only one taken” scene makes you wonder if there were other photographs taken that day with someone posed in the other chair.

The recipient of this card was Ethel, wife of Delmar I. Paine. The couple appears on the 1900 Federal Census for Saratoga Springs, NY at the Van Dam St. address, with their children, Walter L. and Edwin Paine, ages seven and three.

Sources:  Year: 1910; Census Place: Hubbardton, Rutland, Vermont; Roll: T624_1616; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 0184; FHL microfilm: 1375629. (Ancestry.com)

Year: 1900; Census Place: Saratoga Springs Ward 2, Saratoga, New York; Roll: 1159; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 0129; FHL microfilm: 1241159. (Ancestry.com)

Mary, Martha And Annie Julin And Olga Lund

Divided back, Real Photo Postcard. Circa 1908 – 1910. Kruxo stamp box.

Price:  $15.00

Four beautiful ladies posing for the camera, and identified on the back of the postcard:

Back row, left to right:  Mary Julin; Olga Lund, age eighteen.

Front row, left to right:  Aunt Martha Julin; Annie Julin.

According to the family member who gave us the i.d. on the back of the postcard, the year the photo was taken was 1903, but divided back postcards were not used in the United States until December 1907, and the style of stamp box, per Playle’s, indicates the card would have been made between 1908 and 1910. So, this could have been an older photo that was not turned into a postcard until that time, or an incorrect date guess by the family member.

The four women have not been located in records at this time, though there are some possibilities, but none all showing in the same area. We can only presume they lived in the U.S. and it’s probably a safe bet that Martha had emigrated, as she would be the oldest of the group; the other three may also be American immigrants or second-generation of guessing Swedish, Norwegian or Finnish descent. But note, on the nicely-understated jewelry for Mary and Annie…..Annie wears a small pin that shows some type of flag. If we could only make out the details!

I Say Hello George

Divided back, used, Real Photo Postcard. Postmarked February 3, 1908 from Chicago, Illinois.

Price:  $12.00

This card has been hanging around:  I’ve been meaning to get it posted forever but by a nice coincidence, the date it’s going up here at LCG is the exact date on the outgoing Chicago postmark, plus 109 years.

Pretty Elsie, who provided her photo to cousin George, was not identified in records. An in-depth search would be needed to trace the cousinship. (Is this a word? Yep!) She writes:

“I say ‘Hello’ George do you know you[r] loving cousin, How are you old chap, I thought perhaps you might want you[r] little cousins picture, what do you think of my boys coat, classy ‘heh!’ Love to all the family, and also you[r] cousin in Dubuque the one I like. I am with love Elsie.”

Funny how Elsie drops the “r” in “yours” each time, and don’t we get a sense of who she was, from her handwriting, the note itself and the photo? I think she was fun to hang out with. As far as history and fashion it’s always nice to have a dated reference but it’s doubly nice to have the wearer’s comment about what they were wearing. And not that it, by any means, took 109 years for the bow to go out of style, but we can appreciate the irony in the coat being the main subject for comment while today it’s the hat with the huge bow that jumps out at us!

Card addressed to:  “Mr. George Letch, Jr., East Dubuque, Ills.”

Our girl Else, wasn’t found in records but George Leroy Letch, Jr., was born September 19, 1887 in East Dubuque, IL, son of George L. Letch and Theresa Erdenberg. The 1910 Federal Census for Dunleith Township of East Dubuque finds George, Jr. with parents, George L., born IL, October 1864 (occupation freight train conductor) and Teresa, born IL, April 1867 and George, Jr.’s sister Roena, born IL, August 1889.

Sources:  Year: 1910; Census Place: Dunleith, Jo Daviess, Illinois; Roll: T624_294; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 0021; FHL microfilm: 1374307.
(Ancestry.com)

Social Security Applications and Claims, 1936-2007. (Ancestry.com)

Lulu And Paulie Kalunas, Brooklyn, 1915

Divided back, Real Photo Postcard, unused with writing. December 19, 1915. AZO stamp box.

Price:  $15.00

Continuing on with our cold weather theme, a mother and son in Brooklyn, NY posing in winter coats and hats….

A proud mom, Mrs. Lulu Kalunas, writes about her four and a half year old son, who we found in records as Ivan Paul Kalunas, born June 2, 1911 in New York. We take into account that photos were not a dime a dozen in those days, hence the detailed explanation as to young Paul’s expression:

“Brooklyn, N. Y. Dec. 19, 1915. To Ratchel, From Lu Lu. Paulie is 4 years & 6 months old, and has golden hair & dark brown eyes. Note the peculiar expression of his mouth. Paulie has a pretty mouth, but he closed it too tight. He was afraid of the photographer, maybe ???”

Lulu is Clara Louise Dawson (or Louise Clara) born New Jersey, January 1887. On the 1900 Federal Census for Brooklyn, she is living with her mother Clara, stepfather Frederick Koster, and younger sister Helen. It must have been a family member that had written Lulu’s name in pen on the card, and now we can see that what looks like “Kodu” is actually Koster.

The 1920 Federal Census for Brooklyn showing the surname misspelled as “Kluanas” lists Paul’s father as born in Riga, Russia (now Latvia) and Lulu working as a pianist at a theater. Their address is 11a Woodbine St.

The 1925 New York State Census shows Lulu and Paul listed twice:  Clara and Paul Kalunas living with Fred and May Koster (stepfather and May must be Lulu’s mother) and again as Lulu and Ivan P. Kalunas, with Lulu as head of household. Looking at the census one imagines a conglomeration of apartments, and maybe 11 Woodbine St., apt. A, had a separate entrance and the census taker was unaware that he’d been to the same household twice. Just a thought!

Sources:  Year: 1900; Census Place: Brooklyn Ward 28, Kings, New York; Roll: 1066; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 0511; FHL microfilm: 1241066. (Ancestry.com)

Year: 1920; Census Place: Brooklyn Assembly District 20, Kings, New York; Roll: T625_1177; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 1305; Image: 482. (Ancestry.com)

History of Riga. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Riga (accessed January 26, 2017).

New York State Archives; Albany, New York; State Population Census Schedules, 1925; Election District: 27; Assembly District: 20; City: Brooklyn; County: Kings; Page: 33. (Ancestry.com)

Year: 1945; Arrival: New York, New York; Microfilm Serial: T715, 1897-1957; Microfilm Roll: Roll 6905; Line: 29; Page Number: 130. (Ancestry.com)

Mrs. Thysell Restored

mrs-thysell-mp1mrs-thysell-restored-mp1

Mini-photo, circa 1890 – 1910.

Price:  $30.00 includes original photo and restored digital image 

Size including matting:  2 and 1/2 x 4″

Well, we appreciate whoever it was that wrote the name of this beautiful young woman on the back, even though it was only the married surname. I feel compelled to say thank you, too, to the unknown pencil-scribbler for at least limiting the scribbling to the background! And for sure, a more professional restoration could be done, but she turned out pretty good, after some time spent in Photoshop. Love the flowers added to her Gibson Girl hairstyle. Reverse below:

mrs-thysell-mp2

As to the origin of the surname Thysell, this name comes up most often in Sweden, and we find several possibilities from Minnesota records for our subject:  Was she Emma Roberts, born 1877 in Norway who married Carl John Thysell….or the Caroline E. Nelson born about 1880 in Minnesota who married Nels Albert Thysell….or the Emilia, born 1874 in Sweden who married Albin Gustav Thysell….or the Helen Nelson, born 1880 in Sweden that married Emil Theodore Thysell….or none of the above?

Ezra, about 1907 – 1918

ezra-pc1ezra-pc2

Divided back, Real Photo Postcard, unused with writing. Circa 1907 – 1918 AZO stamp box.

Price:  $3.00

In honor of another Ezra I know (EZ-E, Double E !) Ezra – a great name for a great boy. This one shows a cropped oval image of an adorable little boy, maybe about age four, in coat and billed cap, standing outside in a rural setting. That looks like a barn or some type of outbuilding behind him, and a taller building behind that, maybe a house. His last name is unknown, but at least we have the first. And as for popularity of the name, from the 1910 U.S. Federal Census there were over 1400 boys with this name, that were born between about 1903 to 1907. Contrast that with the common given name John, and we get over 250,000 within the same general parameters.

A U. S. Army WWII Veteran

a-u-s-army-wwii-veteran-p1a-u-s-army-wwii-veteran-p2

Photo, circa 1943. Possible surname on back:  Wright.

Price:  $3.00        Size:  About 2 and 1/2 x 3″

We’re a day late this year for Veterans Day, which was yesterday, but still the sentiment was there, so to honor all veterans…..here’s a snapshot of a handsome African-American guy taken during what appears to be the WWII era. From a little research we think he’s wearing an M-1943 Field Jacket. And the hat, a garrison cap, which bears an insignia on the left-hand side but the design is too blurred to make out. No doubt there are military uniform experts out there who will know. The writing is rather scribbled on the back, but it looks like the young man’s last name could be Wright, and underneath a couple of words, “…..?….cook” or could that first word be an abbreviation of signal? which then makes one think it would be Signal Corps, though that’s probably stretching it.

Sources:  M-1943 Field Jacket. Military Items.com (accessed November 12, 2016).

Garrison Caps. At The Front Shop.com. (accessed November 12, 2016).

Scheuneman’s Store, Gary, Indiana

The page below had likely been part of a publication on Lake County history or maybe German immigrants to Indiana. Per the writing on the back, it had been saved by a Scheunemann and Raasch descendant, until it later ended up at a paper fair, where we found it.

Size of full page:   About 9 x 5 and 1/2″        Size of image:  6 x 2 and 3/4″

Price:  $10.00

A page out of Gary, Indiana history….circa 1880s – 1890s

scheunemans-store-bp1

“Uncle Fred. Scheunemans store in Gary with Aunt Alice, Alma & Walt & their hired girl standing[?] also Uncle Fred…[?]… Granpa Raasch was the delivery man, Granpa Scheuneman & Aunt Minnie’s home next door to south & Uncle Fred &…[?]…lives up stairs above store.”

scheunemans-store-bp2

Cropped version below. The sign on the right in the photo is quite difficult to read, and we could be wrong, but the first two lines look like “Howe. U.S.”

scheunemans-store-bp1

Below, the 1880 Federal Census for Tolleston, Indiana (now part of Gary) shows Fred Schoeneman (Sheuneman) born 1830, his occupation listed as Extra Sand [?] something to do with the sand mining industry; his wife Wilhemina, born 1825; son Fritz, born 1855, working in general grocery store and bar; daughter Gusty, born 1860, clerk in store; son Richard, born 1863, works on railroad; and daughter Wilhelmine, born 1868, keeping house. All are stated to be from “Pommern” except for Wilhemine, born in Indiana.

1880-tolleston-in-censu

Below, the 1900 Federal Census for Calumet, Indiana also may fit the Scheuneman family that owned the store. (The ages fit if Ludwig is Fred and for daughter Wilhelmina.) Appearing there are Ludwig Scheunemann, born May 1830, Germany, widowed; daughter Wilhelmina, born November 1868, Indiana, single. Living next door is William C. Bunde, born April 1871, Indiana; his wife Emma, born November 1875, Indiana; stepchildren (to William Bunde, if census is correct) Alma Scheunemann, born February 1883, Indiana and Walter Scheunemann, born December 1885, Indiana; and servant August Wagner, born October 1880, Germany. Note that August Wagner’s occupation is grocer-delivery man.

1900-calumet-in-census-scheunemann

Sources:  Year: 1880; Census Place: Tolleston, Lake, Indiana; Roll: 291; Family History Film: 1254291; Page: 487B; Enumeration District: 066; Image: 0393. (Ancestry.com)

Year: 1900; Census Place: Calumet, Lake, Indiana; Roll: 383; Page: 2A; Enumeration District: 0022; FHL microfilm: 1240383. (Ancestry.com)

Tolleston. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tolleston. (accessed October 29, 2016).

Pomerania. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomerania. (accessed October 30, 2016).