Our Front Stoop At 8562

Divided back, unused, Real Photo Postcard. AZO stamp box. Circa 1910 – 1930.

Price:  $2.00

Somewhere there was a beautiful house with a beautiful family….a mom takes a minute away from the cooking and cleaning to pose with her four kids, on the front stoop of their house, numbered 8562….This one was found during the recent Detroit excursion that we’ve been mentioning lately. No way to know what city this was in. If it was Detroit, there were a number of houses, circa 1910 to 1930, numbered 8562, that might fit the bill, but it’s proving to be a needle in a haystack search. We’ll look for more that might be related to this one when we go back next year.

St. Louis Gate, Québec City

Divided Back, unused postcard. Publisher:  W. G. MacFarlane, Toronto, Buffalo-Leipzig. Series or number: I. 405. Printed in Germany. Circa December 1903 – 1904.

Price:  $3.00

The Canadian postal regulations allowed for the Divided Back postcard as of December 18, 1903, hence the start of the approximated date for the card. Prior to the new regulation, any message from the sender would have been written on the front of the card. So, because of the blank space on the front, we wonder if this card wasn’t maybe produced at or shortly after the regulations changed (almost like an example of a very short under-the-radar sub-era appearing between the “Private Mailing Card” that can be found on Pre-divided backs and the “Post Card” printing on the Divided Backs, and don’t we imagine the printers and publishers scrambling a little as they changed over?)

Les Remparts

The St. Louis Gate is one of the four ramparts of the city (a good word – rampart – up till now I never realized this was the word in use, nor that there is a junior hockey team named after them.) Anyway, in general, we like to see what was being said about a subject back in the day, so here’s a clipping from an article that appeared in The Scranton Tribune (PA) in 1894. At the time the article was written, the present-day St. Louis Gate was still fairly new, having been re-built about fourteen years earlier, and re-built maybe about twenty-four years or so before our postcard was published. But to correct the article:  Princess Louise laid the cornerstone of the Kent Gate, not the St. Louis Gate (though it was Princess Louise who declared that the gate known as St. Louis would retain its name.) It was Lord and Lady Dufferin that laid the cornerstone of the St. Louis.

Related LCG post:  “Princess Louise.”

Sources:  Ramparts of Quebec City. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramparts_of_Quebec_City. (accessed March 19, 2017).

“Antique Curios of Aged Quebec.” The Scranton Tribune. (Scranton, PA) Tuesday, December 18, 1894, p. 8. (Newspapers.com)

LeMoine, J. M. Picturesque Quebec:  A Sequel to Quebec Past and Present. Montreal:  Dawson Brothers, 1882. (Google.com)

In Our Front Yard

Old photo, circa early 1900s.

Price:  $3.00       Size:  About 4 and 1/8 x 2 and 1/2″

Gibson Girl hairstyles, sailor dresses, little brother and dog. Front yard posing in wintertime. There are no notes or i.d. written on the back, but imagine remembering the good time had by all. (Mabel, you were falling….That was your fault Eth, you were pulling me down!….) We can only see the back half of the dog, the boy is smiling looking straight into the camera, and what is he holding – could that be a folding pocket camera? The girls are clowning, and have tucked their long dresses into their boots, hanging on to each other in their best attempt to turn themselves into a 3-legged being. Behind them, their home, we presume. And in looking at the prior post (the two photos were found in the same pile) we wondered at first, if they could be some of the same girls, but likely not, this snapshot was probably taken earlier than the other….And what a heavenly front porch this must have been in summertime! Why was the wooden bench on the right turned over on it’s side? That’s another story!

Los Banos, California, Waterfowl Scene

los-banos-california-waterfowl-pc1los-banos-california-waterfowl

Divided back, unused postcard. Publisher unknown. Circa 1920s – 1930s.

Price:  $12.00

This is a seemingly rare postcard; old Los Banos area postcards seem to be few and far between, though there are some vintage ones out there at the moment…..A trip back to the beautiful San Joaquin Valley is now shimmering on the immediate horizon….But this wetland area is beautiful, especially in the early foggy mornings….The description on the back is:

San Joaquin Valley Water-Fowl Group. Donated by Mrs. Delia Fleishhacker to the Museum of the California Academy of Sciences, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco.

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Valley has long been noted for the great variety and abundance of its water fowl. A few species, such as the Cinnamon Teal, Mallard, Spring, Redhead and Ruddy duck, breed in the Valley, and may be found there in limited numbers throughout the year. The principal breeding grounds of most of our ducks and geese are north of the United States, in Canada and Alaska. After the breeding season, when the young are able to fly well, these northern breeding species come southward to their winter feeding grounds, one of the greatest of which is the San Joaquin Valley. This group shows a typical scene on the grounds of the Los Baños Gun Club, in February, just as the sun is setting beyond the Coast Ranges at Pacheco Pass, and just as a flock of white-fronted Geese is arriving.

At first it was unclear exactly what was donated according to the back of the postcard (a painting?) but the following newspaper clipping from 1936, appearing in The Brooklyn Daily Eagle points to the postcard showing off (though obviously not in the best detail) one of the museum’s displays of stuffed birds, part of a group of San Joaquin waterfowl exhibits.

museums-and-monuments

As to the donator, Mrs. Delia Fleishhacker was a well-known San Francisco philanthropist and mother of eight, who also was distinguished through her poetry and travel journals. Maiden name Stern, she was born 1839 in Albany NY and at the age of seventeen, married German immigrant Aaron Fleishhacker. The Fleishhacker name figures prominently in both the history of San Francisco and Jewish pioneers in the American West. Below, Delia’s obituary from the Oakland Times, September 23, 1923:

mrs-delia-fleishhacker

By steamer, mule and wagon

The following excerpt is from Jeanne E. Abrams Jewish Women Pioneering the Frontier Trail:  A History in the American West (2006).

Some woman traveled by land, some by sea, and many combined the two modes of transportation. In 1857, Delia Stern Fleishhacker traveled to Virginia City, Nevada, from Albany, New York, with her husband Aaron, first by steamer and mule through the Panama route, and then by wagon from California. The discovery of the rich Comstock Lode in the area would for a time make Virginia City a bustling metropolis. Aaron and Delia operated a grocery and dry-goods store in the mining town, and the energetic Delia helped deliver babies born to miners’ wives. Before long, the couple, who would become the parents of eight children, moved to San Francisco, where Aaron Fleishhacker opened a thriving box company with a windfall from a miner he had grubstaked.

A very worthy restoration

Besides contributing to the West’s pioneer history, another of the Fleishhacker family’s historical legacies is The Mother’s Building, which was part of the former Fleishhacker Playfield and Pool complex, and now stands in need of some definite t.l.c. It was built in 1925 on land donated by two of Aaron and Delia Fleishhacker’s sons, Herbert and Mortimer, to honor their mother. (Herbert was the founder of what became the San Francisco Zoo.) And in viewing the photos of the grand and beautiful building we wonder what it was like exactly back when it was in use. What did they call it? (Nothing found in newspaper accounts.) And maybe this is romanticizing the past, but from our vantage point, it seems to have been such an oasis of beauty and spaciousness, compared to today’s pool and beach changing areas – struggling to change out of the wet bathing suit, in a small space where you’ve just discovered the door latch doesn’t work and you’ve got a million bags and your bigger kid in the next stall and a younger one crammed into the one you’re in, and oh by the way, there’s the toilet to contend with, too. (Weren’t there actual changing rooms here last time?) As for the Fleishhacker Pool – it was huge, accounts say it held six or 6.5 million gallons of filtered, heated sea water (heaven) and had a tall diving platform for the brave. The pool, it’s stated now, would not be feasible to re-build, but the Mother’s Building, when it’s restored (let’s say when) in our fast-paced, multi-tasking-is-the-norm world will, I like to imagine, restore a little bit of our sanity. 😉

Sources:  “Museums and Monuments.”  The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 21, 1936. Sunday, p. 50. (Newspapers.com)

“Mrs. Delia Fleishhacker.” Oakland Tribune, September 23, 1923. Sunday, p. 20. (Newspapers.com).

Abrams, Jeanne E. Jewish Women Pioneering the Frontier Trail:  A History in the American West. New York University Press, 2006. (Google eBook).

Pon, Elton. “Hope for Historic Mother’s Building.” March 23, 2016. (San Francisco Recreation & Parks).

“Tag Archives: Mothers Building.” July 27, 2016. The Living New Deal. (accessed December 1, 2016).

Historic Sites, Fleishhacker Pool. San Francisco Zoo & Gardens. (accessed December 1, 2016).

The Arcade

The Arcade pc1The Arcade pc2

With wonderful memories of summer

This one was going to be put up directly after the recent Coney Island post, but something got lost in translation, lost in the shuffle, there was some interruption to the thought process or just brain fade maybe 😉 But it’s a beauty, isn’t it? A little sad perhaps, with that end of summer feel to it. On the other hand, maybe the arcade is happy to have a well-deserved rest and some peace and quiet. In any case, the building has a half-timbered style facade (around it’s entirety we assume) diamond-pattern window panes above, and a large, fan-style window over the double doors. What exactly did the arcade house during the season?

Well, what exactly is an arcade?

The word arcade comes from the Latin “arcus” which means arc or bow. And the definition generally describes a covered passageway that houses shops, with arches along both sides. But in modern times we probably think of a game arcade or a cantina housing food concession stands and perhaps souvenirs. If you look closely you can see two wooden oblong objects, each ending in a box shape that juts out, one attached at each side of the double doors. What were these used for – to contain the list of tenants that rented the selling space every year?

A definite artist

It’s also interesting that someone, with a quite steady hand, filled in the roof with pencil, taking care to outline the roof vent, and even drawing in a little something to show grass or weeds at the base of the utility pole.

The birch

As to the location, there is a small stand of birches to the left of the pole, indicating that this photo was probably taken in one of the northern U.S. states, as birches are prevalent in the Northern Hemisphere of the planet. They are considered a “pioneer” species that show up after a forest is clear-cut or after a fire.

Divided back, Real Photo Postcard, unused. Cyko stamp box. Circa 1907 – 1920s.

Price:  $15.00

Sources:  arcade. [http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/arcade] Accessed September 9,  2015.

Where do birch trees grow? [http://www.ask.com/home-garden/birch-trees-grow-fc33b08d46570b5f] Accessed September 9, 2015.

Real Photo Postcard Stamp Boxes. Playle.com. [http://www.playle.com/realphoto/photoc.php] Accessed September 9, 2015.

First Church Of Christ, Scientist, Boston

First Church Of Christ Scientist Boston pc1First Church Of Christ Scientist Boston pc2

Well! How nice to be wrong when thinking this might have to go to the mystery category. It’s normally quite painstaking to identify (if we get lucky) unknown buildings. But this one was found in Google images of domed churches showing right up at the top. No scrolling, even! The building in the foreground is the original church, but see a full description of both buildings in this Wiki article.

And, of course, this is a Real Photo Postcard, and according to Playle.com, this style of Defender stamp box logo dates from about 1920 – 1945.

Divided back, Real Photo Postcard, unused. Defender stamp box. Circa 1920 – 1945.

Price:  $20.00

Sources:  First Church of Christ, Scientist. n.d. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_First_Church_of_Christ,_Scientist. (accessed May 24, 2015).

Real Photo Postcard Stamp Boxes. Playle.com. Web accessed May 24, 2015. [http://www.playle.com/realphoto/photod.php]