Log Cabin Home, 1934

Photo, white border. October 2, 1934.

Price:  $7.00       Size:  3 and 1/2 x 1 and 7/8″

A child in overalls, standing outside their log cabin home, location unknown. This is a beautiful photo, for content and composition:  There’s the path, right from our viewpoint, leading up to the doorway; the home nestling in the woods and off-center of the image; evidence of the wood-burning stove currently in use; and other details to notice, such as the wash basin hanging next to the door, and the somewhat concave appearance of the cabin’s side. And it’s almost like you could hit “play” and see video – the child walking towards us, smiling face appearing out of the shadow, or maybe turning to go into the house, the stovepipe smoke blowing easterly….

On the back is written,  “At least they have a roof. A well-to-do Indian half-breed.”  Well, maybe the individual that wrote the comment had just come from seeing some other cabins not as well put together. Also it was 1934, so better terminology was not yet common, evidently.

But for me, it looks like a small slice of heaven (as I sit typing this with the heavy traffic rolling by).

235 N. Normal Ave, Burley, Cassia County, Idaho

Old photo, circa 1919 or 1920.

Price:  $15.00

A hipped roof house, photo a little blurry, but still a gem….And it’s been printed on the type of stock that was used for Real Photo Postcards though, as we can see, it couldn’t have been a postcard since the usual postal printing does not appear on the back.

“house faces west, this is front.  Dear Carrie  This does not Flatter the house as I really think this looks rather shabby but I dont know why this looks worse then it realy is to me. I will have another view taken not so close and more landscape. the Brick School is on the next Block south of us with no buildings between us yet. when I get it Painted it will look better. I have a little garden, a few beans, Peas, Radishes, Potatoes, tomatoes, Planted lots of seed that never came up for want of water, sowed more Beets, are coming nicely now not large but will make small Pickles hope tomatoes will too. The number on the house is 235. Can you see it? I Just got my old Shack moved the 25th. C. C. went that day, and made the man move it before he went, been Paid for ever since April, am using it for storehouse and coal house, may fix it up to rent not quite sure as it will take some money to do it, wish I could tho as it would be a good help this winter. do you write to Susie. I owe her & John a letter, do you write to Florence. I haven’t said half but good night. love from Harold to all, mother, me too.”

Ahhh, another beauty of a find that’s filled up with writing on the reverse! (We put up an RPPC a few posts ago.) This was written by Mary Bowne, who was born in Connecticut about 1866, of Irish/English descent, and widow of Linus Bowne. Mary’s occupation was private nurse, from the 1920 Federal Census for Burley, Cassia County, ID. The census and city directory show her at 235 N. Normal Avenue, and the census lists her as head of household for herself, son-in-law, Charles Moeller (a widower), and twelve-year-old grandson, Harold Moeller.

Sources:  R. L. Polk & Co.’s Polk’s Twin Falls, Blaine, Camas, Cassia, Gooding, Jerome, Lincoln and Minidoka Counties Directory 1920-1921. Page 351. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Year: 1920; Census Place: Burley, Cassia, Idaho; Roll: T625_290; Page: 10B; Enumeration District: 134. (Ancestry.com).

Close Hauled

Divided back, artist-signed postcard. Postmarked August 8, 1910 from San Francisco, California. Artist: D. P. Crane. Publisher:  H. G. Zimmerman & Co., Chicago, IL.

Price:  $8.00

Addressed to:   “Mrs. A. Schweitzer, Napa, Calif. Box 253”

The sender wrote:   S. F.  8/8/1910   Dear Lena:- Again home with the folks again. [?] comes the 1st of Sept then we will come up for the day. All O.K. here. Love to all at home. [Dodie?]  1228 Octavia St.”

We didn’t find a match in online records for the sender of the card at the given address:  She is findable, most likely, but would require some heavy searching. So, moving on to the recipient: The 1910 Federal Census for San Francisco shows Lena Schweitzer, age 38 with husband Alvin, age 35, and their nine year old son, Seymour L. Both Albert and Lena were born in Germany, and Seymour was born in New York.

“Close-hauled” is a sailing term – one of many “point of sail” references. A quick definition from the Merriam-Webster dictionary is:  “having the sails set for sailing as nearly against the wind as the vessel will go.”  But see the Wiki link below for a more detailed explanation.

Sources:  Year: 1910; Census Place: Napa Ward 2, Napa, California; Roll: T624_90; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 0080; FHL microfilm: 1374103. (Ancestry.com).

Close-hauled. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/close-hauled (accessed June 9, 2020).

Point of Sail. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Point_of_sail (accessed June 9, 2020).

I’m In With All The Swells!

Divided back postcard. Postmarked December 18, 1913 from Wichita, Kansas. Publisher:  Williamson-Haffner Co., Denver, Colorado. Artist name unknown.

Price:  $12.00

Addressed to:   “Mrs. Ida McFrederick, Harper, Kans, Route 3.”

The sender wrote:  “Dec 18 – 1913. send my mail up here. Hello Ma, Guess I won’t be home Sat. so don’t look for me until you see me. am working now. by by   Florence.”

Per Walter E. Corson’s, Publishers’ Trademarks Identified, the publishing house is the Williamson-Haffner Company, of Denver. So, the initials appearing at the bottom left corner of the illustration must be those of the artist. (Name unknown at this point, but maybe we’ll find out later.)

Thanks, Florence (for passing along) the wonderful phrase on the card, “Don’t look for me until you see me.”  Might remind you of the conundrum we find ourselves in when we contemplate time travel…..and some of the great comedic vignettes we’re familiar with:  Two that come to mind are Joe talking to Frito at the Costco Shuttle in Idiocracy, and one of Big Bang’s segments, something along the lines of, “Okay, we agree that if one of us invents a time machine, we’ll meet right here at exactly (whatever o’clock.)” They look around the room, and then….damn, disappointment. (Not sure – President Not Sure? 😉 ) what episode this was from and this is only from memory, but you probably know the one I mean.)

From the 1905 Kansas State Census, the family is parents, William and Ida McFrederick, and their children, Carl, William, Roy, Earl, Florence and Fern. With the family is a young McDowell (possibly) couple (who may or may not be related) by marriage to the McFredericks. Florence would have been about eighteen when she sent this postcard to her mom.

Sources:  Corson, Walter E. Publishers’ Trademarks Identified. Ed. James Lewis Lowe. Norwood, PA:  1993. (print).

Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, Kansas; 1905 Kansas Territory Census; Roll: ks1905_62; Line: 13. (Ancestry.com).

E. K. Reynolds, Norwich CT Trade Card

Trade card, lithograph by Bufford, Boston, Mass. Circa 1878 – 1890.

Price:  $15.00

“After the race – off City Point, Boston Harbor.”

“E. K. Reynolds, French China, Grockery, Glass Ware & House Furnishing Goods.  Norwich, Conn.”

Yep, that’s a typo there – of course, they meant Crockery. And in checking the internet, this card is the only one that we see right now for E. K. Reynolds. It’s in good condition, other than the white mark, top left-hand side of the card, which is paper that had gotten stuck to it, at some point. The lithograph company name is printed in the waves there on the bottom right.

Edward Kennard Reynolds was born December 3, 1834 in Cecil County, Maryland. He married Fannie Foster and they had two daughters, Bennibel and Nellie. Edward died September 5, 1884, and from city directories, Nellie carried on the family business for a while. The last mention found (in a quick directory search) is for Mrs. E. K. Reynolds, in 1890, business address 159 Main and 17 Shetucket. The earliest directory found was for 1878.

Sources:  Price, Lee & Co. Steadman’s Directory, Norwich, 1878. No. 18. P. 199. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Price, Lee & Co. Steadman’s Directory, Norwich, 1890. No. 30. P. 402. Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 05 June 2020), memorial page for Edward Kennard Reynolds (3 Dec 1834–5 Sep 1884), Find a Grave Memorial no. 92408525, citing Yantic Cemetery, Norwich, New London County, Connecticut, USA ; Maintained by Northern Neighbors (contributor 47033135) .

A Formal Occasion, Onboard Ship

Photo, white border. Circa 1910s – 1940s.

Price:  $6.00         Size:  About 2 x 2 and 7/8″

A snapshot found in a loose box of photos, location and ship name are unknown, and the date is unknown. If you enlarge the photo you’ll see three men in non-military type hats, that are walking with the officers. Maybe they are dignitaries of some sort.

Memorial Day Parade, Hazel Park, MI, 1966

Divided back postcard, unused, 1966. Photo by:  Southeastern Michigan Business & Professional Women Association. Series or number 12842-C. Publisher:  L. Goldberg & L. Wilson, Hazel Park, Michigan. Printer:  Dexter Press, Inc., West Nyack, New York.

Price:  $5.00

“1st Prize Float, Memorial Day Parade. May 29, 1966. Hazel Park, Michigan.”

That’s a helicopter represented in this flower-covered float, honoring the “Fighting Soldiers From The Sky.” Note the rotor blades that are blending in with the crowd.

Marchande de Poissons, Côte d’Argent, Bordeaux, France

Divided back, unused postcard. Phototypie by Marcel Delboy, Bordeaux, France. Series or number 46. Circa mid – late 1910s.

Price:  $15.00

It’s always exciting to find a card like this – filled, or nearly so, with words. You know it meant something to the person that wrote it – it was not a casual thing. (And for us, the reader – anticipation, often resulting in…..delight!)  This one is pretty special:

“A fish woman merchant. It is remarkable how there old women will balance and carry great heavy loads. They are always women – never have seen any men. One day I was walking on the road at a good pace one of these women with a basket like this on her head overtook and passed me. There was a tin can in the centre of the basket which looked like a milk can but whether full or empty I can’t say of course. On each side of the can was a live duck with their necks stretched out over the edge of the basket looking this way and that way evidently enjoying the scenery as much as any one would in a “rubber neck wagon.”

The term phototypie that appears before the photographer (or printer’s) name is, in English, collotype.

Source:  Collotype. n.d. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collotype (accessed May 3, 2020).

Les Bonnes Nouvelles de la Marelle

Vintage envelope, made in France. Date unknown. Publisher:  La Marelle.

Price:  $2.00        Size:  5 and 1/2 x 3 and 1/2″

This one reminds me more of an underwater scene from a fantasy world:  mushrooms growing from the sandy ocean floor, “seaweed” gently rolling…. butterflies navigating a gentle current…..letters grouping together to form words….

But anyway, all are appearing on the front of an unused envelope put out by La Marelle – a French publishing company that produces work by various licensed artists, on stationery, travel bags, mugs, earrings and other items. (La Marelle translates as hopscotch.)

Alfred J. Brown Seed Company, Grand Rapids, Michigan

Trade Card for the Arthur J. Brown Seed Company, circa 1905.

Price:  $8.00         Size:  3 and 1/2 x 5″

Spring has already sprung and yesterday was a beautiful day with half the neighborhood out doing gardening. So, here’s a trade card with nasturtiums and morning glories from the Alfred J. Brown Seed Company out of Grand Rapids, MI.

Choice Flower Seeds

“The Success of the Flower Garden depends principally upon the quality of seeds planted. We sell the Best and only the Best that grows. Alfred J. Brown Seed Co. New location Corner Ottawa and Lewis Streets. Grand Rapids, Mich.”

The ad below, appearing in March 1925, in The Daily Times (New Philadelphia, OH) indicates that the Alfred J. Brown Seed Company was established in 1891. Evidently, the company was quite successful since the most recent city directory found for them appears in 1946, address 37-45 Campau Ave. But our card above is from around 1905, since this is the first year they show up at the then new location, the southeast corner of Ottawa and Louis. The year prior they were doing business from 24-26 N. Division and 20-22 N. Ottawa.

From the 1900 Federal Census and Find A Grave, Alfred J. Brown was born December 1860 in England. He was married to Sarah “Sally” Thrasher, and they had two sons, Thomas and Robert.

Sources:  The Daily Times (New Philadelphia, OH) March 20, 1925. Friday, p. 5. (Newspapers.com).

R. L. Polk & Co.’s Grand Rapids Directory 1888, p. 202. (Newspapers.com).

R. L. Polk & Co.’s Grand Rapids Directory 1904, p. 243. (Newspapers.com).

R. L. Polk & Co.’s Grand Rapids Directory 1905, p. 233. (Newspapers.com).

Grand Rapids Directory Company Polks Grand Rapids (Kent County, Mich.) City Directory 1946, Vol. LXVIII, p. 138. (Newspapers.com).

Year: 1900; Census Place: Grand Rapids Ward 10, Kent, Michigan; Page: 22; Enumeration District: 0082; FHL microfilm: 1240723. (Ancestry.com).

Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi. (accessed April 19, 2020).